Cerebral Palsy Research Network Blog

CPRN Seeks to Translate Knowledge Broadly

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) decided to increase its investment in knowledge translation following its annual investigator last week. For CPRN, to “translate knowledge broadly” means to reduce practice variation by implementing best practices and evidence-based medicine across the 26 sites in its network. Reducing practice variation has been demonstrated to improve outcomes which is central to the mission of CPRN. By tackling this in a whole network fashion, CPRN expects to improve outcomes for a broad population of people with cerebral palsy (CP) in North America.

CPRN held a modified version of its annual investigator meeting last week. Originally planned to be an in-person meeting of more than 40 investigators prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, last week’s meeting was attended by more than 50 investigators from more than 30 institutions via Zoom. Review of CPRN’s five-year strategic plan highlighted the need to invest more in knowledge translation. CPRN will pursue transforming its network into a learning health network – an established model for rapidly improving health care outcomes for a variety of diseases and conditions.

Peter Margolis, MD, PhD

Peter Margolis, MD, PhD

CPRN hosted Peter Margolis, MD, PhD from Cincinnati Children’s Hospital as a guest speaker and an expert on building Learning Health Networks. His presentation sparked an enthusiastic dialogue amongst investigators to establish new quality improvement initiatives including adult care for CP, hip surveillance and dystonia in addition to our existing initiative for intrathecal baclofen pumps. CPRN’s adult care initiative, led by CPRN Exec Committee member Ed Hurvitz, MD, has already begun planning the new initiative to improve treatments and outcomes adults with CP.  The other initiatives will establish leaders and working teams in the coming weeks.  CPRN expects its increased investment in quality improvement initiatives will build on its cerebral palsy registry, complement its research efforts and accelerate the improvement in outcomes for people with CP.