Resources for adults with cerebral palsy, such as research and educational presentations, plus an interactive forum you can join today!

 

A boy with cerebral palsy with white hair and sunglasses smiles riding his trike.

Cerebral Palsy Awareness Day Winners

Today, March 25, is the federally recognized Cerebral Palsy (CP) Awareness Day! We are excited to announce the winners for our third annual CP Awareness Month photo contest. In February, we began accepting submissions in three categories that we thought were important to represent our community: around town, diversity and celebrations & holidays. Each of the following submissions were selected by being the top three photos in these categories in votes out of 14,236 counted:

First Prize Winners ($100 each)

Around Town Diversity Celebrations & Holidays

Levi taking big boys steps in his gait trainer — featuring little brother holding up his ventilator circuit

A child with cerebral palsy smiles in his standing frame.

We are thankful for therapists! They give everything we need!! This is to help assist with standing!

A boy with cerebral palsy smiles at his red elf on a shelf.

Beckham loves his elf on the shelf, Charlie, who has a G-tube just like him!

Second Prize Winners ($75 each)

Around Town Diversity Celebrations & Holidays

Toddler twins in red and white pajamas with one playing roadkill

Identical twins –Everleigh running her sister Emerson over road kill — CP wont stop either of them

A young man with cerebral palsy in a maroon jersey plays street hockey.

Cerebral Palsy may bring challenges, but I always find ways to overcome them! (Avalanche Special Olympics Clinic)

A little girl in pink glasses and a red striped dress smiles while her cousin hugs her.

Kia celebrating her favorite holiday Fourth of July with her cousin

Third Prize Winners ($50 each)

Around Town Diversity Celebrations & Holidays

A toddler with cerebral palsy smiles on her red trike out on the sidewalk.

When it is nice out Anya loves to go cruising around on her bike. She is learning to keep her feet on the peddles and to use both hands to steer.

A boy with cerebral palsy in his stander wearing green and blue striped pajamas.

Grayson in his stander.

A young man in a wheelchair sits next to a neon sign advertisting his lemonade

Garrett’s Famous Lemonade: Every year he has a Lemonade Stand to raise money for different charities and an accessible van for us. Last year was for Curing Kids Cancer

Congratulations to each of these photographers and subjects for their selection and their prizes of $100 for 1st place, $75 for 2nd place and $50 for 3rd place.

Best Photo Overall

In addition to these winners, the staff and volunteers of the CP Research Network voted for best overall photograph in terms of what represented the CP Research Network’s values. The decision was SO hard as there were so many great photos. The winner is:

A boy with cerebral palsy and white hair smiles broadly out on his adaptive trike.

JOY-riding: 7 year old boy named, Ford. He is the brightest human being with white hair, and ocean blue eyes. He is riding his adaptive bike from Freedom Concepts around town.

Congratulations to Effie Parks for the photo of Ford “JOY Riding” for the $500 prize!

Honorable Mentions

The photos were so great this year that we decided to quadruple our funds for honorable mentions. Voting strongly favored young children in seven of the nine winners. The staff recommended a number of honorable mentions. Thanks to you all for these great photos.

Thank you to EVERYONE that participated – submissions, shares and votes. We hope the sharing of pictures and our awareness banners helped you all create awareness for CP and celebrate our vibrant community! Wear your green proudly today! We will be in touch about your prizes over the next week!

Our logo featuring a C and a P in shades of green forming a support ribbon for Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month 2024

Join the Cerebral Palsy (CP) Research Network in our activities to celebrate National CP Awareness month. This recognized month is a great opportunity for us to create awareness about living with CP for the general public to help fund research, support disability policies, and to promote inclusion.
There is so much you can do to help the community:

  1. In February, we launched our 3rd annual CP Awareness photo contest for your favorite picture in each of three categories on our website. We will be awarding a total of $1,300 in cash prizes to the winners on national CP Awareness DayMarch 25th! You have until March 15th to submit your photo.
  2. Starting March 16 you can vote – and share them on social media to help them gather more votes.
  3. We have CP facts as Facebook banners that you can download and use to spread the word. We will be posting CP facts throughout the month on our Facebook and Instagram – feel free to share those!
  4. You can buy CP Research Network merchandise at our store and wear green through the month!
  5. You can make a donation to the CP Research Network or start a Facebook fundraiser for us!

Please help us in our efforts to spread awareness for cerebral palsy!

Four contestants featured from last year's contest.

Cerebral Palsy Awareness Photo Contest 2024

An adaptive basketball coach in a wheelchair lifts a boy with cerebral palsy overhead in his own chair to dunk a basketball

Last year’s Best Overall winner: Dawn McKeag: Slam dunk!

In advance of Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month, which runs each year throughout the month of March, the Cerebral Palsy Research Network is introducing the third annual Cerebral Palsy Awareness Photo Contest to highlight the lives and experiences of community members living with CP. The contest invites members of the community to submit up to five photos photos that depict their day-to-day life, adventures, challenges, joys, and journey. The CP Research Network has opened its gallery for submissions and will award $1,000 in total cash prizes to 10 winners on March 25, 2024 – the day officially designated as National CP Awareness Day in the United States.

“Since we started this contest in 2022, the community has rallied each year to create awareness and to help us build a library of authentic photography about people with CP” said Paul Gross, President and CEO of the CP Research Network. “The community has openly let us into and to share their lives in a way that is truly meaningful for CP Awareness.” The CP Awareness Photo Contest seeks to celebrate the lives of people with CP in a way that can be used in the CP Research Network’s variety of education, awareness and wellbeing programs on our website, on social media and our marketing materials!

The CP Awareness Photo Contest is opens today on CPRN.ORG. Contestants must be members of MyCP and may participate as an advocate, clinician, researcher or community member. Prizes will be awarded as follows:

Category 1st
Prize
2nd
Prize
3rd
Prize
Celebrations and holidays* $100 $75 $50
All ages “around town”* $100 $75 $50
The diversity of our community* $100 $75 $50
Honorable mentions** 5 x $25
Best Overall* $500

* These categories are awarded based on the highest number of votes by the close of the contest.
** These categories are award by an internal vote by the CP Research Network staff.
Special consideration will be given to photos in landscape format.

Winners will be chosen via a combination of votes and final selection by the CP Research Network. Contestants must sign a photo release as part of the entry process. Photos will be displayed on CPRN.ORG and CP Research Network social media channels. Detailed rules for entries can be found on the photo contest rules page. Dig through your archives or snap a new picture and submit it soon!

 

To be a contestant and be eligible to win, you must be logged into your MyCP account. If you are not a member, you may join for free as an advocate to participate in the contest. MyCP offers a number of benefits for free if you join as a community member, e.g., a person with CP or a parent/caregiver, but you do not need to share more than your name and email address as an advocate.

MyCP logo

Participate in discussions or research on CP.

A stack of grey rocks, also known as cairns, sit on a rock with waves breaking in the background on a foggy day.

Mindfulness: A Key to Wellbeing in Cerebral Palsy

Headshots of two women from the National Center for Health, Physical Activity and Disability involved in mindfulness training

Emily Hornsby, on the left, is a mindfulness instructor and Tracy Flemming Tracy on the right, is a healthcare inclusion specialist.

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network and its partner, the National Center for Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) will offer a MyCP webinar on mindfulness next Monday, February 12 at 8 pm ET. The practice of mindfulness, a type of meditation, is easy to learn and is proven to reduce stress as well as provide other wellbeing benefits such as relaxing the mind and body. NCHPAD healthcare inclusion specialist, Tracy Flemming Tracy, OT, PhD(c), will give an overview of NCHPAD Connect which provides access to a variety of health programs of which the MENTOR wellbeing program is the cornerstone. Mindfulness instructor Emily Hornsby will discuss the benefits of mindfulness and lead the participants through a mindfulness practice session during the webinar. Interested members of the community can join the session by registering.

The “M” in the “MENTOR” program offered by NCHPAD is for mindfulness and a key component of the education in this remarkable program offered to physically disabled members of the community. The MENTOR program also offers training in exercise and nutrition as well as providing wellbeing coaching during the eight-week free program. The CP Research Network worked with NCHPAD to pilot the MENTOR program for the CP community in 2022. In 2023, NCHPAD and the network partnered to introduce the NCHPAD Connect programs with a special focus on the MENTOR program to members of the CP community.

In addition to her role as the Healthcare Inclusion specialist, Ms. Tracy is also a licensed Occupational Therapist and a PhD Candidate in the School of Health Professions at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Over the past 7 years, she has focused on research involving telerehabilitation and its promotion among people living with physical disabilities. In her current role with NCHPAD, she has been able to implement a participant-centered approach to recruitment, program delivery, and retention to enrich the participant experience and collaborations with healthcare and organizational partners.

Emily Hornsby is the Mindfulness Curriculum Coordinator for the MENTOR Program, a certified mindfulness meditation teacher including the mindfulness classes for the MENTOR Program. She has worked with individuals who have been severely injured and disabled through her previous work as a personal injury attorney for over 25 years. She is passionate about teaching mindfulness to participants of the MENTOR program. Through mindfulness practices it is Ms. Hornsby’s intention that participants will discover more freedom in how they respond to external stimuli and that they will find more clarity, peace and acceptance in the face of difficulties in their life.

Please join us for this unique session of information and mindfulness practice. The speakers will be available to answer questions about mindfulness, MENTOR, and the other programs available to the community through NCHPAD Connect.  A recording of the webinar will be available on our YouTube channel or click on the link below.

Mindfulness
Doctors seated around a conference table discussing research

Adult CP Studies Featured in AACPDM SIG

On Tuesday, February 6 at 4pm ET the Cerebral Palsy Research Network will be giving an update on some of its adult research efforts at next week’s meeting of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM)’s Special Interest Group (SIG) for Adults and Aging. This virtual meeting entitled “Research Updates in Adults with CP “ is open to the public and typically includes a blend of adult clinical providers, nonprofit advocates and members of the community.

The presentations will include updates from two of the CP Research Network’s projects including our Adult Research Priorities study by Dr. Cristina Sarmiento and our Adult Study of Classification of Pain by Drs Amy Bailes and Mary Gannotti. Both of these studies have been funded through our partner Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation. We will be joined in the presentation by Dr. Mark Peterson and Rachel Byrne who will share the progress for developing Adult Care Guidelines.

The Adults and Aging Special Interest Group is one of a small number of AACPDM SIGs that combines members of an AACPDM Committee, with other members, non-members, and people with lived experience. The Adults and Aging SIG is chaired by a leading member of the AACPDM Lifespan Committee Dr. Heidi Haapala. This two-hour meeting will include presentations and open discussion about the work being presented. It is an excellent opportunity for community members to learn more about work in the field to advance the care of adults with CP.

Joining the meeting requires pre-registration. Please join us for this important update on our efforts to improve the health and wellbeing of people with CP.

Night sky with colorful fireworks

Happy New Year! 2023 in Review

As we turn the page on 2023, we look back with much appreciation for all that our extended community is doing to accomplish our mission of improving the health and wellbeing of people with cerebral palsy (CP) and their families. Many of you have engaged in the work of improvement in care and new knowledge generation through creation of or participation in studies. We thank you all for your efforts, your willingness to share ideas and resources with your colleagues and researchers, and your unrelenting drive to make life better for people with CP.

We kicked off the year with an impactful strategic partnership with Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation (CPARF) which is the largest private funder of CP research funding in the United States and a disability technology accelerator. The CP Research Network has fundraised together with CPARF as part of their STEPtember campaign and CPARF has supported all of our existing research efforts as well directly funded three new studies – two for adults and one for children.

Our research program benefited from the guidance of our data coordinating center at the University of Pittsburgh. A big shout out goes to Dr. Stephen Wisniewski and his whole team at Pitt for their innovative perspective on study designs, advancing our data collection and reporting, and increasing the scalability of network to enable more clinicians and community members to participate in making new discoveries in cerebral palsy. We also benefited from the addition of Dr. Joyce Trost to our research team. Dr. Trost leads our registries which have grown substantially in 2023 and underpin all our work. Alongside her, our scientific director Dr. Kristie Bjornson and Quality Improvement director Dr. Amy Bailes, strengthen our research pipeline and care improvement efforts with their related expertise. Together this team has overseen the development and advancement of 31 studies and improvement efforts including 20 newly initiated THIS year!

What does all this research activity mean to you? First that the CP Research Network is serious about changing outcomes through care for people with CP of all ages. For adults, the network is very focused on pain and its impact on function. Participating centers increased the assessment of pain in adult visits from 24% to over 90% this year and have been funded by CPARF to standardize the classification of that assessed pain so that it can be treated effectively. For children, the network is improving the dystonia diagnosis and working toward network surveillance of hip dislocation which can be a painful result especially for children with CP that are less mobile. Our improvements in care are being built into the electronic medical record system to make the clinical assessment of pain, diagnosis of dystonia and surveillance of hips, part of the standard of care for patients at CP Research Network hospitals. Three new publications this year highlighted just some of the research and improvement in the network including the effort to reduce infections after baclofen pump surgeries, chronic pain in adults, and a study of practice variation in selective dorsal rhizotomy.

Our education and engagement programs have seen large increases in enrollment in MyCP – our interactive web portal for personalized information and participation in research. Our monthly MyCP webinar series has engaged hundreds of community members in live discussions and gathered more than 7,000 views on YouTube this year. Our CP Toolkit continues to be our most often downloaded educational piece helping families understand the meaning of a CP diagnosis.

Finally, our partnership with the National Center for Health, Physical Activity and Disability provided incredible health and wellness opportunities to adults with CP. While only 16 people took advantage of the fantastic MENTOR program that teaches participants about mindfulness and how to get sufficient adaptive exercise and nutrition for improving one’s health, these MENTOR participants raved about the classes and the result, so we hope to triple the number of participants in 2024!

The timeliness of MENTOR has been invaluable to me, given my life stage, CP journey, and the additional impact of my other health conditions. The program has equipped me with the necessary skills to manage these challenges, such as mindset, activity levels, and nutrition. Additionally, the one-on-one opportunities to meet with staff have helped me fine-tune my approach.
Marji – MENTOR program graduate

We have exciting plans for 2024 including much deeper involvement of the community in our research program starting with opportunities to attend our annual investigator meeting in April and participation as co-investigators on developing projects. We anticipate a lot of progress, improvement, funding and results from our myriad research projects under development. And at least two new toolkits will be launched this year!

Dr. Sarmiento smiles broadly with her brown hair pulled back, in a navy blazer and light colored swoop neck blouse.

New CP Research Network Publication on Adults with Cerebral Palsy and Chronic Pain Experience

Dr. Sarmiento smiles broadly with her brown hair pulled back, in a navy blazer and light colored swoop neck blouse.

Dr. Cristina Sarmiento is a rising young investigator in the CP Research Network with her first network publication and an Accelerator Award granted in October. She focuses on issues of transition and adults with cerebral palsy.

The Cerebral Palsy (CP) Research Network congratulates Cristina A. Sarmiento, MD and her co-authors[*], for the publication of her CP Research Network manuscript, “Adults with cerebral palsy and chronic pain experience: A cross-sectional analysis of patient-reported outcomes from a novel North American registry”. The Disability and Health Journal released this peer reviewed article in November 2023, our first publication based of our adult study launched in MyCP in 2019. The publication describes the pain experience and its impact on function and quality of life among adults with CP who have chronic pain. It marks a tremendous milestone in furthering our understanding and sharing of adult pain research.

Approximately 70% of adults with CP report some type of pain with increasing rates of chronic pain with aging. Prior work has shown that pain has significant implications for activity and quality of life for adults with CP although the long-term effect of pain is not known. Not surprisingly, understanding chronic pain and the treatment of pain in adults with CP has been identified by individuals with CP, caregivers and providers and the National Institute of Health as a top CP research priority. The Cerebral Palsy Research Network is providing a rich opportunity to collect systematic, longitudinal data on people with CP such as the data used in this study.
The authors of this study sought to describe the pain intensity, interference, locations, changes, and helpful treatments experienced by participants as well as how quality of life and function are affected by pain. Information was collected from 2019 through 2022 through including functional changes and information about chronic pain through surveys circulated by the CP Research Network in our Community Registry which is hosted in MyCP — our personalized web portal on CPRN.org. The authors are inspired to continue to pursue learning about pain experience in adults with CP because they know that chronic pain is a significant, common condition for many adults with CP, affecting so many aspects of life – mobility and daily function, tone, sleep, mental health, quality of life, social participation, and more. However, they don’t yet have good ways to accurately identify, classify, and treat pain in adults with CP. The Community Registry allows adults with CP to tell us about their pain experiences so clinicians and researchers can better understand chronic pain in CP, with the goal of ultimately improving its management. We discussed some of these findings in a MyCP webinar.

Among participants in the Community Registry where community members report their experiences with CP, 78 % reported having chronic pain. The average age of pain onset was 28 years with low back and legs the most frequently reported areas of pain. Pain interfered most with work, walking and sleep. GMFCS level and age did not affect severity of pain reported. Individuals most frequently tried physical therapy, massage and exercise and stated that these non-pharmaceutical treatments helped to decrease the pain although for the vast majority of participants, their pain was worse than or the same as it was a year prior. Adults with CP with moderate-to-severe pain reported that their pain interfered with function and activities and had greater depression and lower satisfaction with social roles compared to those with mild pain.

Unfortunately, chronic pain in adults with CP often goes unrecognized and under-treated. Many adults with CP tend not to seek professional treatment and rather self-manage their pain, highlighting a critical gap in clinical practice. The authors recommend based on this work that all adults with CP, regardless of age or degree of physical disability get screened for pain, as they are at higher risk for chronic pain at younger ages compared to the general population. Screening and classifying pain is the goal of one of our research projects funding by our partner CP Alliance Research Foundation.
The full journal article is available for free download for the next 15 days in The Disability and Health Journal. After January 1, 2024, only subscribers to The Disability and Health Journal will have access. Dr. Cristina A. Sarmiento, MD first author of this publication, practices at the University of Colorado Anschutz, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation specializing in inpatient and consult pediatric rehabilitation medicine, transitions of care for adolescents and young adults with disabilities. The CP Research Network is particularly excited for Dr. Sarmiento, a young investigator / clinician who has been mentored by several clinicians in our network including her co-authors. She is also the recipient of an Accelerator Award to set priorities in adult CP research.

*Mary E. Gannotti, PT, PhD, Paul H. Gross, BA, Deborah E. Thorpe, PT, PhD, Edward A. Hurvitz, MD, Garey H. Noritz, MD, Susan D. Horn, PhD, Michael E. Msall, MD, Henry G. Chambers, MD, Linda E. Krach, MD

An empty winner's podium

Webinar: Priorities in Adult Cerebral Palsy Research

Professional headshots of four investigators smiling for a cerebral palsy adult study.

Drs. Sarmiento, Gannotti, Hurvitz, along with Jocelyn Cohen, will present on priorities in adult CP research.

Next month’s MyCP webinar will focus on a new study that we are conducting to establish priorities in research about adults with cerebral palsy (CP). The webinar will be held on Wednesday, December 6 at 8 pm ET. It will be led by CP Research Network principal investigator Cristina Sarmiento, MD. Dr. Sarmiento and her colleagues Jocelyn Cohen, JD, Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD, and Ed Hurvitz, MD, will present their plans for a study that was funded by our new Accelerator Award program made possible by our partner Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation.

In 2017, the CP Research Network was funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to engage the community in creating a patient-centered research agenda. The program included a series of educational webinars followed by a collaborative idea generation process. This led to the creation and ranking of the most important questions to study in CP. A group of 45 people split between community members and physician researchers, gathered in Chicago in June 2017 to finalize the agenda. That agenda referred to as Research CP, was published in 2018 and has been a key driver of research conducted within the network. Many of the top-ranking themes were about adults, aging, functional decline, pain, and exercise to maintain functional abilities. This new study will again engage the community but in a different format that leverages focus groups to dive deeper into the research questions that underlie the themes that have been identified and prioritize them for clinical study.

This upcoming webinar will provide an overview of the planned study and discuss how members of the community can engage in the process. We will leave a significant amount of time for questions and answers with the entire study team. If you are interested in joining us, you must register in advance (though MyCP Webinar subscribers will automatically be sent the link to join the webinar). The webinar will also be recorded and posted to our YouTube channel within 24 hours.

Award: Study of Pain in Adults with Cerebral Palsy

Headshots of two women with shoulder length brown hair and glasses smiling broadly.

Cerebral Palsy Research Network leaders Drs Bailes and Gannotti will lead a study of adult pain classification funded by CPARF.

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network has been awarded funds for a three-year study in the classification of pain for adults with cerebral palsy (CP). This study was the subject of October’s MyCP webinar. Classification of pain in adults is fundamental to identifying proper treatments and improving outcomes. Congratulations to co-principal investigators Amy Bailes, PT, PhD and Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD who will lead the team which includes the rest of the members of the Adult Care Quality Improvement.

The CP Research Network applied to Cerebral Palsy Alliance Research Foundation (CPARF) for this award earlier this year. CPARF’s research funding was a very competitive cycle this year and we are honored to receive this funding to advance our essential study of pain in adults with CP. We expect that this work will have a very broad impact on adult care by beginning to address pain, one of the most important issues identified through our Research CP program — our community created research agenda.

The study team comprises clinician investigators from Columbia University, Nationwide Children’s Hospital which has an adult outpatient clinic, University of Michigan, and the University of Colorado. This team has already demonstrated that it can improve the care of adults across multiple centers with its Adult Care QI initiative. This effort led to a substantial increase in the assessment of pain across participating CP Research Network centers from 24% of the time to over 90% percent of visits. Now the group is planning the next important step in the systematic treatment of pain – classifying it accurately as a critical step to effective treatment. The study will begin with a Delphi process to identify the best tools to classify pain during a clinical visit. The appropriate classification of an individual’s pain will enable clinicians to choose the most appropriate treatments.

We look forward to the successful execution of this grant and transforming how pain is treated in adults. People interested in the background for the study can watch October’s MyCP webinar with the study team. Adults wanting to participate in our research should either join MyCP to regularly contribute your lived experience to our research or take our initial adult study of wellbeing and pain.

A banner about nutrition in cerebral palsy features a colorful bowl of vegetables and legumes.

Growing Up Well with Cerebral Palsy: Improving Nutrition, Health, and Wellbeing

A balding man with dark rimmed glasses smiles broadly in a white lab coat with a colorful striped tie.

Dr. Richard Stevenson, a developmental pediatrician at UVA, will present on the role of nutrition in health of children with cerebral palsy.

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network is excited to announce its November MyCP webinar entitled “Growing Up Well with Cerebral Palsy: Improving Nutrition, Health, and Wellbeing” with Dr. Richard Stevenson, Developmental Pediatrician and Division Head – Neurodevelopmental and Behavioral Pediatrics at the University of Virginia Health. The webinar will take place on Tuesday, November 14, at 8 pm ET. Dr. Stevenson has been leading efforts in the network to investigate the role of nutrition in overall growth and health for children with cerebral palsy (CP).

Growth is considered an integral indicator of nutrition, health, and wellbeing in children. The regular measurement of growth and comparison to reference data is a key component of health maintenance in children across the globe. In general, if a child is growing well compared to their peers, then they are considered to be disease free, adequately nourished, and living in a safe and “good enough” environment. Children with cerebral palsy are smaller in stature compared to their peers and in proportion to the severity of their motor impairment. But this raises many questions:

  • Is this growth pattern a problem that is modifiable?
  • Is the difference in growth due to poor nutrition, due to medical co-morbidities, due to poor activity levels or other factors that can be manipulated?
  • Does this difference in growth for children with CP matter?
  • Is it associated with poor health or with differences in quality of life?

A part of the overall differences in growth in people with cerebral palsy is the manner of growth and maturation of bone and muscle, and that bone and muscle problems (e.g. spasticity, contracture and osteoporosis) contribute to chronic pain and decreased mobility over the lifespan. Could these long-term problems be mitigated through childhood management of diet and physical activity?

Dr. Stevenson will review current knowledge on growth and nutrition and the relationships among growth, health, physical activity, and wellbeing in children with cerebral palsy. He will also discuss knowledge gaps and opportunities for additional research and improvements in how we care for children with cerebral palsy with the goal of improving health and quality of life across the lifespan. Dr. Stevenson also looks forward to community input on these questions and more. To join the webinar, please register using the form below or at https://cprn.org/mycp-webinar-series/. A recording of the webinar will be posted to our YouTube channel within 24 hours of the presentation.

Growing Up Well with Cerebral Palsy