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A blond woman kneels while speaking with her daughter braided hair in a wheelchair.

Results: Communication and Participation in CP

Kristen Allison, PhD, CCC-SLP. A smiling woman with long blond hair wearing earrings and a light grey sweater.

Kristen Allison, PhD, CCC-SLP, an Assistant Professor at Northeastern, is this month’s featured speaker for the MyCP Webinar Series, presenting the results of her recent study in speech and language for children with CP.

Next Wednesday, November 17, at 8 pm, Kristen Allison, PhD, CCC-SLP, will present the results of her study of Speech and Language Predictors of Participation in Children with Cerebral Palsy, as part of the CP Research Network’s MyCP Webinar series. Dr. Allison received our Research CP grant award in 2019 for her study investigating how speech and language capability affect a child’s quality of life in terms of participation in activities. Attendees of this webinar will learn what she discovered and be able to participate in a live Q&A with Dr. Allison.

“We found that several aspects of a child’s speech and language skills affect how often they participate and how involved they are in social activities.” said Dr. Allison. “Our results highlight just how important effective communication is to quality of life for children with CP!”

Dr. Allison is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders and the director of the Speech Motor Impairment & Learning (SMILe) Lab at Northeastern University. The study was hosted and distributed through th CP Research Network Community Registry and data collection was completed in 2020. Dr. Allison will not only share the results of the study but talk about its meaning for both parents of children with CP, but also how the data will be used to inform future research questions.

Community members interesting in learning about the results of Dr. Allison’s research can sign up to receive webinar login instructions. People who have already registered for the whole MyCP webinar series will be sent an invitation with login details prior to the webinar. Note: Our MyCP webinar series now require a Zoom account to sign in. You can get a free Zoom account here.

The MyCP webinar on assessing pain in adults with CP will be delivered by Drs Gannotti and Noritz

Assessing Pain for Adults with Cerebral Palsy

Drs. Gannotti and Noritz, dressed in business attire, at an informal meeting in Austin, TX

Drs Gannotti and Noritz, clinicians who treat both children and adults, will present on assessing pain in adults with cerebral palsy (CP).

This month’s MyCP webinar will focus on the CP Research Network’s Adult Care quality improvement (QI) initiative at 8 pm ET on Monday, October 25. CP Research Network leaders Garey Noritz, MD and Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD, will provide an overview of this initiative which is focused on pain for adults with CP. Quality improvement, like clinical research, is aimed at improving health outcomes but using a different methodology to achieve those outcomes. QI is exciting because it can change health outcomes much more rapidly than clinical research. The webinar will include a brief overview of how QI enables these faster changes in outcomes.

Our Adult Care QI initiative includes clinicians that treat adults with CP and community advocates working together with a global aim of improving the care that adults with CP receive. Supported by data from our Adult Wellbeing and Chronic Pain study, this initiative has narrowed it first efforts to uniformly assess pain in each clinic visit for adults with CP. In addition to support from our ongoing study, a recent MyCP focus group with several adults with CP helped shape initial assessments of pain used by the participating clinicians.

Dr. Gannotti is a professor of physical therapy at the University of Hartford and a PT affiliated with Shriners’ Hospital of Springfield and co-leads the adult study group of the CP Research Network. Dr. Noritz is the Director of the Complex Care program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and an adult internist who treats adults with CP. Doctors Gannotti and Noritz will present for approximately 25 minutes before opening the webinar to questions and answers. Community members who wish to participate in the webinar can sign up on CPRN or to receive an email with a link to the recording after the webinar.

October 6 is World CP Day - Millioins of Reasons to Spread the Word

CP Research Network Featured at AACPDM

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network was invited alongside of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), and C-Progress to teach early-stage investigators how to establish a successful research program at their institution during the annual meeting of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM). The nine-hour pre-conference tutorial featured presentations from each of these research and funding organizations to emphasize key steps for an investigator to get funding. The CP Research Network is differentiated from its co-presenters by being an organization that facilitates and conducts research.

In addition to presenting the network’s programs, registries, and tools, CEO Paul Gross held a breakout session for Q&A with interested attendees. “It was an honor to present our mission and vision alongside the largest public funders for research – NIH and PCORI,” said Gross. “The attendees also heard from Dr. Michael Kruer about his experience working with the CP Research Network to gain $3M in funding from NIH for his genetic causes of CP study.”

This pre-conference session fell on October 6 – World CP Day – when the CP Research Network Board of Directors has offered to match donations two-fold! World CP Day creates awareness about CP and much needed research around the globe. We are excited to be part of accelerating that research by educating new investigators to the field.

A green page banner with a headshot of Dr. Wade Shrader. A smiling man with short brown hair and beard wearing a dark suit.

Webinar on Hip Surveillance and CP

Dr. Wade Shrader of Nemours/AI duPoint, smiling in a blue suit, is an orthopedic surgeon who leads the CP program at Nemours

Dr. Shrader, an orthopedic surgeon, leads the hip surveillance initiative for the CP Research Network.

After taking a break during the last month of summer, our MyCP webinar series will resume on Wednesday, September 29 at 8 pm ET with a presentation on our hip research program. Hip pain is the most frequent cause of pain in children with cerebral palsy and can cause problems with mobility and range of motion. We have begun a hip surveillance program at our the CP Research Network centers to proactively address this issue—a very challenging task to undertake. Our upcoming webinar will feature Dr. Wade Shrader, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon and Division Chief of Cerebral Palsy at Nemours/AI duPont Hospital in Wilmington, DE who leads this effort for the network. He is also the parent of four children, two of whom are adults with CP.

In order to protect the hips of children with CP, the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Development Medicine (AACPDM) released an updated “care pathway” recommending the frequency and techniques for monitoring the hip health of children with CP in June 2018. Care pathways combine the latest evidence-based medicine and expert opinion to provide guidance on how to treat complex conditions. Dr. Shrader will discuss the anatomy of childrens’ hips, the impact of CP, the importance of monitoring hips, and how parents and caregivers can advocate for their child’s hip health.

“I know first-hand as a Dad how tough recovery from hip reconstruction surgery can be, “ said Dr. Shrader. “I’m looking forward to talking with the CPRN community about hip issues in Cerebral Palsy, and to give my perspective as both a pediatric orthopedic surgeon and a family member.”

Community members and clinicians interested in the webinar can sign up on cprn.org. MyCP members and series registrants will receive the Zoom link automatically prior to the webinar. Join us!

A scene from Hawaii with two palm trees standing in a lush green field with the ocean beyond and a perfect rainbow behind them.

Caregiver Mental Health: The Importance of You

“You gain strength, courage, and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. You must do the things which you think you cannot do.” — Eleanor Roosevelt

Caregivers often put their entire heart and soul into the care they give others. For most being a caregiver was never a choice, more so a job taken on with determination and courage. Taking care of any child requires time, patience, understanding, love, and an immense amount work. When adding a child with a disability into the equation these requirements are greater. As a caregiver, it is important to take time for self-care. When caring for others it is important that you also take care of yourself.

A lush, living wall of greenery with neon sign that says "breathe" in script with a pale pink written at a 45 degree angle

Focusing on your breathing, an essential step in meditation, is a great way to calm your mind.

Parents/Caregivers face uncertainty and anxiety particularly as they adjust to their new caregiving roles. Arranging healthcare providers, keeping up with day-to-day needs, and making major medical decisions are just a few areas of concern ]caregivers have. All these tasks, and more, require a great deal of time and patience. Unfortunately, many caregivers get lost in the process.

Some parents find the needs of the child so overwhelming that they neglect their own health, either because it seems insignificant or because it is too costly to eat well and get proper rest and respite from caregiving responsibilities.
Freeman Miller, M.D.
Pediatric Orthopedic Surgeon

Therefore, it is so important as a caregiver to identify symptoms of ongoing stress that may lead to anxiety or depression. Taking time for self-care and seeking professional guidance and counseling can mitigate and prevent caregiver burnout.

What do anxiety symptoms look like for caregivers? (ADAA, 2020)

  • Constant fearfulness, worry or impending doom and excessive sweating
  • Trouble eating or eating too much
  • Shortness of breath that keeps coming back
  • Sleep problems and irritability
  • Heart racing or beating hard in the chest

What do depression symptoms look like for caregivers? (ADAA, 2020) Depression for anyone can vary in symptoms. When looking at symptoms directly related to caregivers here are some things to consider:

  • Avoiding pleasurable or meaningful activities because you feel guilty about taking time off from caretaking
  • Repetitive nightmares or intrusive thoughts about the patient/loved one, including the diagnosis, treatments, or future prognosis
  • Inability to sleep (with falling asleep or sleeping too much)
  • Feelings of exhaustion, severe tiredness
  • Feelings of tension and chronic irritability
  • Inability to concentrate or remember details
  • Anxiety attacks about not properly following the medical regimen
  • Inability to talk to others about your experience as a caretaker
  • Anticipatory anxiety about future treatments for the patient/loved one
  • Thoughts of suicide because you feel so overwhelmed, worthless, or inadequate

A lush, living wall of greenery with neon sign that says "and breathe" in script with a pale pink written at a 45 degree angle

Focusing on breath going in and out can help bring about a more calm state.


Practical self-care tips:

Self-care encompasses many different things-some that many may have not considered. It can be a nice bath, or a hot shower, a walk around the neighborhood alone, or even a glass of their favorite beverage. If the activity is done with intention and is enjoyable it can be a form of self-care. Eating well and getting good sleep whenever possible can help prevent periods of burnout and severe drops in mood (Marilynn, 2018).

Caregivers are hard on themselves; they have a huge job to do. Sometimes the inner voice that whispers to always ‘do better’ needs to be muted. The self-critical voice has to be stopped for a louder self-compassionate one to emerge (Marlynn, 2018).

Another thing great for relaxation and self-care practices are breathing exercises (Marlynn, 2018). Deep breathing techniques done for only 5-10 minutes a day can help recenter the mind. Accompany these exercises with positive affirmations and conscious instruction to get the best results.

Affirmations can start with ‘I am’ and include statements like:

I am enough. I am worthy. I am a good caregiver. I am a great parent. I am capable.

Instructions that you speak aloud to yourself can look like:

I breathe in calm and relaxing energy.

I pause to let the quite energy to relax my body.

I breathe out and release any anxious or tense energy.

*Breathing exercises should never be painful or uncomfortable. Remember to always only do what is comfortable for you and modify exercises it to better suit your individual needs.

Other relaxation exercises can include yoga, tai chi, guided meditations, hypnosis, and progressive muscle relaxation. We live in a world where the internet offers plentiful resources where we can find a lot of information. Use the internet to help you find local programming or relaxation tools/apps or, seek the support of a licensed counselor/physician

Social support is also another important part of self-care. Caregivers do not have to take on everything alone; try and connect with people who are willing to help and support you. Take time to spend a day with friends. Join a support group whether it be online or through a community program. The Cerebral Palsy Research Network has an online forum with groups spanning many different topics.

It is important to realize when you or someone you know needs help outside of family support. Talk to a healthcare provider if you are struggling. Asking for help is okay! Remember to take care of others properly you must take care of yourself!

Friendship Line: 800-971-0016

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 800-273-8255 (TALK)

SAMHSA: 800-662-4357 (HELP)

Samaritans: 877-870-4673 (HOPE) (call or text)

Crisis Text Line: Text “HOME” to 741741

Veterans Crisis Line: 800-273-8255 (press 1) or Text 838255

References

Caregiver mental Health: Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA. Caregiver Mental Health | Anxiety and Depression Association of America, ADAA. (n.d.). https://adaa.org/find-help/by-demographics/caregivers.

Marlynn Wei, M. D. (2018, October 17). Self-care for the caregiver. Harvard Health. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/self-care-for-the-caregiver-2018101715003.

Miller, F., & Bachrach, S. J. (2017). Cerebral palsy: a complete guide for caregiving (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press.

Stiles, K. (2021, April 23). Depression hotline numbers. Psych Central. https://psychcentral.com/depression/depression-hotline-numbers#hotline-numbers.

A three-panel banner of St. Louis Children’s Hospital and headshots of Dr. Toni Pearson and Dr. Bhooma Aravamuthan.

St. Louis Children’s Hospital Joins Our Network

Dr. Ton Pearson, with short brown hair smiling in a white lab coat, leads the Cerebral Palsy Center at St. Louis Children's

Toni Pearson, MD, Medical Director of the Cerebral Palsy Center at St. Louis Children’s Hospital is a pediatric movement disorders neurologist.

Dr. Aravamuthan, a movement disorders neurologist, smiles with dark rimmed glasses and long, brown hair in a white lab coat

Bhooma Aravamuthan, MD, DPhil, is a pediatric movement disorders neurologist at St. Louis Children’s Hospital who specializes in the treatment and research of cerebral palsy.

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network is happy to announce that St. Louis Children’s Hospital and Washington University in St. Louis have joined our network. Toni Pearson, MD, Medical Director of the Cerebral Palsy Center at St. Louis Children’s Hospital and her colleague Bhooma Aravamuthan, MD, DPhil, will lead both institutions in the participation in network research and quality improvement activities. St. Louis Children’s Hospital (SLCH) is a tertiary-care (a hospital that is highly specialized) children’s hospital affiliated with Washington University in St. Louis, and is the largest pediatric referral center in Missouri and the surrounding region.

The SLCH Cerebral Palsy (CP) Center is based in the Division of Pediatric and Developmental Neurology, and treats approximately 800 unique patients annually. The CP center cares for a diverse range of patients with childhood-onset conditions associated with motor impairment, including cerebral palsy as well as varied genetic, metabolic, and neurodegenerative conditions.

The core interdisciplinary CP clinical team is composed of 4 pediatric neurologists with subspecialty training in movement disorders, 2 pediatric physical medicine and rehabilitation physicians, physical therapists, an occupational therapist, a social worker, a nurse practitioner, and a nurse coordinator.

The CP Center works in collaboration with the Neurosurgery Center for Cerebral Palsy Spasticity (directed by Dr. T.S. Park), as well as colleagues in Orthopedic Surgery, the SLCH Pediatric Complex Care Clinic, and the Neonatal Neurology Clinic, to coordinate care for children with CP from infancy through adulthood.

CP Center faculty are engaged in research projects on the pathophysiology and clinical characterization of dystonia following perinatal brain injury, pediatric deep brain stimulation for genetic and acquired dystonia, and the clinical characterization and natural history of rare neurogenetic developmental motor disorders.

The footer from the CP Research Network website on a dark green background, with a pink button indicating ‘Edit Notifications’.

Personalize Your Cerebral Palsy News

We have added a simple way for you to personalize your cerebral palsy news from cprn.org. We post information – educational information, research news, CP daily living experiences and community “CP stories” several times a month on our website.

A segment of a dialog box shows how users can choose which categories they receive email notifications for

The My Notifications page allows you fine grained control over the emails you receive from the CP Research Network.

There are three ways to get these updates from cprn.org:

  1. Any time you may visit our blog at https://cprn.org/blog
  2. Subscribe to our alerts and receive an immediate email for every new post
  3. Join the MyCP community platform and customize your updates from us. MyCP also gives you the opportunity to contribute to research, engage with peers, clinicians and researchers on our forum, and receive customized reports and resources based on your experiences with CP.

By joining MyCP you can customize your CP Research Network emails by choosing the categories or authors of most interest to you. Do you want to read about our latest advances in CP research – just check the CPRN Studies category! Want to learn how we can keep you healthy – just select “Wellbeing.” Interested in practical tips from experiences living with cerebral palsy – “CP Daily Living” is the topic for you; just want info about adults with CP – choose “adults”.

Join MyCP to personalize your content from the CP Research Network today! Or if you are already a member, go personalize your content.

A grey page banner with a photo of Heather Hancock, a smiling woman with long brown hair wearing a red sweater and glasses.

CP Stories: Heather Hancock Defies the Odds

How Heather Went from Survival to Pioneer for Change

From the moment she was born prematurely, CPRN advocate Heather Hancock was battling to survive. Today she reveals how she is still fighting for adequate care for adults with cerebral palsy.
Heather Hancock, pictured with long brown hair and red shirt, wire rimmed glasses with a book case behind her is an editor

Heather Hancock is a writer and an editor as well as an advocate for cerebral research and care for adults.

When Heather Hancock was born more than three months prematurely – at 25 weeks gestation – doctors warned she would struggle to survive the first 24 hours of life.

But Heather defied the odds. After three months in an incubator, the tiny baby was well enough to be taken home. That was the first day her mother, Edna, was allowed to pick up her baby and hug her.

As a toddler growing up in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Heather was slow to crawl and meet her physical development milestones. Meanwhile, her younger brother, Colin, born 13 months after her, was advancing rapidly.

Her family faced a fight to enroll her at the local school.

“Back then, disabled children were shunted away to special schools out of the public eye,” she says. “I was integrated into the public school system, which was great for my education but not good for my social life. Kids did not accept me very well, and neither did their parents, so I endured incessant bullying from kindergarten through to grade 12.”

The bullying took its toll on Heather. By the age of 14, she was having suicidal thoughts but fought through them, crediting her faith for continually bringing her comfort and purpose during dark times.

As an adult, Heather was keen to pursue a career as a registered nurse but faced more hurdles. Halfway through her training program, she began to experience pain in her knees. Being on her feet for hours on end and the job’s physical nature was too much for her. Mustering her characteristic grit, Heather went back to college to get an office administration certificate. She was determined to work in healthcare and took up a position as a unit clerk in an outpatient clinic.

However, after a 22-year career, Heather began to experience painful lower back spasms. The pain made it impossible for her to walk for several hours each day, and she took medical retirement at 44.

“It seemed like nobody could tell me what was going on,” she recalls of that time. “In Canada, there is no doctor that specializes in adults with cerebral palsy. It feels like you are just cut loose when you are 18 and told to “have a good life!”

Although she underwent rehabilitation and saw physiatrists who work with spasticity and stroke patients, she noticed a stark difference from the care she’d received as a child.

“It can get harder to find a team of doctors as you get older,” she explains. “Today children with cerebral palsy are sometimes treated by a multidisciplinary healthcare team. It would be great if adults had the same access to help, equipment, and physical therapy. Finding the right team of doctors is crucial so that everyone can put their heads together and come up with a plan.”

Professionally, Heather pivoted to other talents. She forged a new career as a professional coach providing inner healing for women suffering from trauma and abuse. Then, in March 2019, Heather began working as a contributing writer penning fiction and poetry for CoffeeHouseWriters.com. She became an editor in June 2020. Working to her own schedule helps manage her pain.

“When you are your own boss you can schedule things for times that work better for you,” says Heather, who now writes from home in Maple Creek, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Meanwhile, Heather continues to advocate for the Cerebral Palsy community. She relentlessly contributes to research and discussions on the CP Research Network’s MyCP community forum to ensure that the “absence of knowledge and care for the adult CP community” is addressed. She is also pushing for change with her local cerebral palsy association in Saskatchewan and national and international groups.

“I’ve been a pioneer since I was old enough to walk,” she smiles. “I may not see the benefit in my lifetime, but the younger generations will.”

Thank you Heather for sharing your inspiring story!

Marquis Lane, a smiling young man seated on a walker, wearing a Georgia sweatshirt with four friends behind him at a stadium.

CP Stories: Marquise Lane

Marquise Lane, with a beaming smile and glasses sits listening to music in his college dorm with a navy football sweatshirt

Marquise is always smiling ear to ear — here while listening to music in his dorm room.

It’s a daily decision to keep fighting and believing in yourself.
Marquise Lane
Client Success Specialist

For Marquise Lane, succeeding at college wasn’t just a matter of working hard and pushing himself academically. Conquering his CP mobility hurdles and achieving independence were also vital.

When Marquise Lane graduated from UGA in 2016 with a BA in Management Information Systems (MIS) the moment was extra special to him.

As a young person with cerebral palsy, Marquise hadn’t just put in the hours of study needed to gain his degree, he’d also worked tirelessly to overcome the physical hurdles holding him back from his college dreams.

In high school, Marquise got up very early to make sure he dressed himself – here in khakis and a grey argyle sweater.

Marquise was determined to be independent from an early age so he made sure he got up early to have time to dress himself.

“I always wanted to go to college,” says Marquise, 27, who lives in Valdosta, GA. “But it wasn’t the mental things like the schoolwork that were in the way, it was more of the physical things like dressing and putting shoes on.”

Armed with a positive mental attitude, Marquise took on the challenge with gusto. Throughout his 12th grade, he got up extra early in order to practice mastering the independent skills he needed to succeed.

“I had to leave the house at 7 am so I’d get up at 5.30 am to give myself that extra time to dress and put my shoes on by myself – just to practice,” he recalls. “For a while I needed help but I got to the point where I was independent enough. Eventually, my mom agreed I was ready to go to college.”

Marquise was diagnosed with Spastic Diplegia cerebral palsy at the age of three and says he grew up fully understanding what having CP meant.

A young Marquise, in a white t-shirt, demonstrates his domestic skills by ironing a pair of his dark slacks

A young Marquise Lane takes up ironing his own slacks to help out around the house.

As a young boy, Marquise wanted to do the same activities as other kids his age but also knew his circumstances were different

At seven years old, Marquise wanted to do all the activities his peers did including baseball!

“My mom’s always been big on talking to me like an adult so from three I knew what I had,” he says. “I don’t really like the word “different” because I do feel like I’m a normal person, I just have a different set of circumstances I have to deal with. As a younger kid I looked at other kids and saw them do things like swing on the monkey bars and then play football and sport. I wanted to do that too, but it was hard because I couldn’t. You have to fight that feeling of “I’m not good enough” or “I’m weird.” Every day you have to wake up and focus on the small victories and the positive things you’ve done. That provides momentum to keep going forward.”

At UGA, Marquise lived alone on campus in an accessible room and says he is grateful for the friends he made who would always lend a helping hand with things like Walmart and barbershop runs. His challenges on campus ranged from navigating the hills in Athens, GA, to working out how to get from A to B. From the start, the college paired him with a disability coordinator tasked with ensuring all his classes were accessible and that he had all the help and resources he needed.

“UGA went out of its way to make sure I could get to where I needed to be,” he says. “I had all the tools I needed to succeed academically and UGA provided a van service that took me from class to class and just about anywhere else on campus I needed to go.

Marquise Lane sits down on his aluminum walker smiling with a wrought iron arch and a building with white pillars behind him

Marquise Lane sits on his walker smiling while on his college campus

“There were several occasions where an entire 300-person class was moved because the original building wasn’t accessible for me and I had letters to share with professors so they were aware of any special assistance I needed.”

Regardless, it took stamina and endurance for Marquise to keep pushing toward his academic goals.

“It was tough at times,” he says. “When you look around you see that most people don’t have to work as hard as you do to accomplish basic tasks. They don’t have to worry about accessibility and how far away things are. I learned to focus on myself and limit comparisons.”

Marquise Lane, in a red sweatshirt at a job fair, sits holding a large white sign with the words “Hire Me” in red

Marquise was not shy in pursuing work out of college.

He cites graduating from college as the culmination of belief in himself and hard work. “It showed me and my family that I could do anything I put my mind to,” he says.

Since graduating in May 2016, Marquise has worked as a client success specialist for ProcessPlan. His goal now is to continue living independently and advance his career.

“There isn’t some magical point where you have things figured out and that’s it,” he says. “Having a vision for the things you want to accomplish in life helps. Once you have a vision, you can break that down into actionable steps and go forward. It’s a daily decision to keep fighting and believing in yourself.”

Small preview image of Dr. Laura Gilbert linking to blog post

Dystonia Agenda Takes Center Stage at Child Neurology Society Meeting

Laura Gilbert, DO, a pediatric neurologist, with shoulder length brown hair and a dark green shirt, smiles broadly.

Laura Gilbert, DO, has won a Junior Member Award from the Child Neurology Society, for her abstract on a patient-centered dystonia research agenda.

Dr. Laura Gilbert, a pediatric neurologist at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, has been selected to present our Dystonia in Cerebral Palsy patient-centered research agenda at the Child Neurology Society (CNS) meeting in Boston, MA in September 2021.

Her talk, entitled, “Top 10 Areas of Research Need for People with Cerebral Palsy and Dystonia: A Novel Community-driven Agenda,” is based on collaborative work she carried out with the Network to engage the community in a research priority setting process for dystonia in CP in 2020.

“Dr. Gilbert played a significant role in the organization and analysis of our dystonia agenda setting process,” said Bhooma Aravamuthan, MD, DPhil, a pediatric movement disorders specialist from Washington University in St. Louis. “She is a smart and savvy burgeoning clinician researcher. It’s been a gift to see her interest bloom in dystonia in CP.”

The Child Neurology Society gathers neurologists annually to advance research and the treatment of pediatric neurological conditions. The live platform presentation has been selected as one of the top 20 abstracts submitted to the meeting. Further congratulations are in order for Dr. Gilbert who will be recognized as one of four Outstanding Junior Members for her work.

Her talk, and talks by her mentor Dr. Aravamuthan, will increase the focus on CP at this year’s CNS meeting. This increased focus will improve child neurologist awareness of issues faced by people with CP and promote research opportunities in the field.