Research presents cerebral palsy research updates, funding and funding opportunities, as well as new publications and the information offered within them, to keep the cerebral palsy community informed. Learn how you can be a part of the conversations by joining MyCP, an interactive cerebral palsy community forum, today!

New CPRN Website

A Labor of Love: Our New Website

Marquis Graduating Walking off stage with a big smile using his walker

The new CP Research Network website on a mobile device

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network will launch its new website – combining all four of its web properties – this Monday, May 24! Our extended community will benefit from this single rich repository of information, resources, research and collaborative tools. In order to learn how to maximize the benefits of our new site, it will be the subject of our next MyCP Webinar on May 26 at 8 pm ET.

Founders Paul Gross and Michele Shusterman will provide background information on the creation of merged site, talk about the design principles and walk attendees through the new user experience, including plans for future enhancements to MyCP.

In January we announced the merger of CP NOW, including its toolkit, wellbeing resources and CP Daily Living blog, with CPRN and its MyCP community engagement site. Carefully sorting how to organize our four web properties was a key step to bringing together CP NOW and the CP Research Network. The new website, found at https://cprn.org, focuses on the four cornerstones of our mission:

  • Engaging the community in research and sharing their lived experiences;
  • Research and implementation of evidence-based health care for cerebral palsy;
  • Educating community members of all ages with content reviewed by experts in CP care;
  • Wellbeing programs for optimizing life-long health.

During this webinar we will demonstrate how to get the most value out of the network and MyCP, including how you can contribute to improving outcomes for people with CP.

Please join us! You can register here: https://cprn.org/mycp-webinar-series/

CPRN Annual Investigators Meeting, 2021

Annual Conference Sparks Innovation and New Research Ideas

Forty-five clinicians from 28 academic medical centers came together on Zoom last month for the Cerebral Palsy Research Network’s fourth annual investigator conference.

Marc Randolph, cofounder and original CEO of Netflix

The two-day online gathering featured keynote speaker Marc Randolph, the co-founder and first CEO of Netflix, who shared pearls of wisdom on decision-making and growth to our diverse audience of research leaders.

Participants, including clinicians from the National Institutes of Health, discussed a range of network studies, including the relevance of genetics in cerebral palsy diagnosis, and brainstormed potential new areas in dystonia research and building capacity to care for adults with CP. 

The meeting also enabled the CPRN team to define goals for an updated 2021-2025 strategic plan, including expanding leadership systems, ensuring financial sustainability, engaging community members, and strengthening research and quality improvement projects. 

“This year, we were able to make extensive use of breakout rooms for discussions and collaborations among smaller groups of investigators,” says CPRN President and Chief Executive Officer Paul Gross. “We were fortunate to have support from the Weinberg Family Center for Cerebral Palsy, making for smooth logistics.”  

Moving to a virtual format proved to be a successful venture with the format and progress of CPRN’s 2021 conference receiving praise from the attendees.

“It was great,” wrote Dr. Ed Hurvitz, chair of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Michigan. “The best Zoom meeting of the year for content, for career development, and being able to connect a bit with friends old and new.”

Paralympian, advocate, and community advisor Duncan Wyeth, also in attendance, remarked: “I have acquired more knowledge and insight over two half-days about my disability and potential system mechanisms to address that disability than at any other time in my life. This meeting gives me great hope and expectations for the countless individuals who will know an enhanced quality of life because of this learning network.” 

Thank you to everyone who gave their time for this important conference. It has set us on an excellent trajectory for 2021 and beyond. We greatly appreciate the commitment of our dedicated investigator team and all their hard work advancing the care of people with CP.

Kristen Allison, PhD, Bhooma Aravamuthan, MD, DPhil, Amanda Whitaker, MD

CPRN Investigators To Detail Important Findings

Three researchers from the Cerebral Palsy (CP) Research Network will present scientific findings at this year’s American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) annual meeting.  

Kristen Allison, Ph.D., a speech pathologist and researcher at Northeastern University, will present “Speech and Language Predictors of Participation in Children with CP,” research made possible through the CP Research Network’s community registry hosted at MyCP.org.  

Allison’s research stems from parent surveys sharing the speech and language capability of children with CP and insights about their interactions with peers and common communication breakdowns due to speech and language impairments.    

Pediatric movement disorders neurologist Bhooma Aravamuthan, MD, DPhil, was also able to collate data through MyCP.org. She will present her findings on community attitudes toward a CP diagnosis and how a complete explanation of causes of CP can benefit those with the condition and their families.  

A third presentation, powered by efforts within the network, will be led by Amanda Whitaker, MD, an orthopedic surgeon who has been examining practice variation in hip surveillance at centers in the CP Research Network. Her findings are already shaping quality improvement protocols as part of the network’s drive to become a learning health network.   

AACPDM’s 75th annual meeting with take place on October 6 to 9, 2021, at Quebec City Convention Centre in Quebec, Canada.

The CP Research Network remains committed to enabling clinicians to conduct research that advances the care of people with CP via our community registry and learning health network.  

Subscribe to our newsletter to stay up-to-date on all our latest CP news. 

New Website Sneak Peak

Here’s a sneak peek at our new website!

Thanks to our merger with CP NOW and new research studies already off the ground, it’s been an exciting year so far for the CP Research Network. So, what’s next? Our new website!   

 Since our January merger, our team has been busy integrating four websites into one to create a new online home – cprn.org – a place where we will bring together our community, research efforts, education, and wellbeing programs.   

Here’s a sneak peek of what’s to come!   

To make things easier to navigate, our one platform, CPRN.org, will feature the four cornerstones of the combined organization:  

1) Community  
Join a committed group of community members on the MyCP platform at CPRN.org. All are welcome, including adults with CP, parents, and caregivers, clinicians, researchers, and advocates shaping impactful research to improve the lives of people with CP.  

2) Research  
The Cerebral Palsy Research pages of our soon-to-be-released site will fill you in on our active studies and highlight opportunities to participate in ongoing research to improve healthcare outcomes for people with CP.  

3) Education  
Please take advantage of our educational resources and programs to help navigate CP from diagnosis to therapies, treatments, and interventions to maintaining mental and physical health and transitioning to life as an adult with CP. You’ll find many toolkits, guides, and resources all ready to download on our education webpages.   

4) Health and wellbeing  
Log on for programs to maintain and improve physical health and wellbeing. We are working with our trusted partners to implement regular opportunities for community members to participate in healthy activities in their communities.  

Excited? We are too! We’ll reveal our launch date soon, but for now, please keep swinging by cpdailyliving.com, cpnowfoundation.org, cprn.org, and mycp.org for everything you need to know about the CP community.    

Dr. Michael Kruer

CP Stories: Why Genetics Matter

“We believe this study will move the needle and help patients and their families.” – Dr. Michael Kruer

As he embarks on a the Cerebral Palsy Research Network’s first publicly funded study into genetic causes of cerebral palsy, Dr. Michael Kruer, Director of the Pediatric Movement Disorders Program at Phoenix Hospital, hopes the landmark research will help transform patient care. 

Working as a dedicated pediatric neurologist, Dr. Michael Kruer is passionate about the young patients in his care and how to improve their treatments and therapies. 

Now, as he launches a three-year study examining how genetic factors connect with a CP diagnosis, he is hopeful the research could lead to better outcomes for many in the CP community. 

“We believe this study will not only move the needle for research but has the potential to impact individual patients and their families,” he tells the CP Research Network.  

Kruer is no stranger to people’s challenges with CP, having dedicated the last ten years to the study of genomics as it relates specifically to the condition. He received the CP Research Network’s first publicly funded (NIH) grant to launch his “Genetics Causes of Cerebral Palsy” study after approaching the network to collaborate on research.  

Five hundred participants and their biological parents will participate at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, AZ, Al DuPont Children’s Hospital, DE, Nationwide Children’s Hospital, OH, Seattle Children’s Hospital, WA, and Children’s Hospital Colorado, CO. 

“The beauty of working with the CP Research Network is it collects information that doctors and therapists enter as they are caring for people with CP at the participating sites,” adds Kruer. “It’s a wealth of information that we’re then able to leverage to try to take the genetics and make sense of it in a way that can impact diagnoses and treatments.”   

The study, which kicked off this month, in unison with CP Awareness Month, will compare the genome (the person’s genetic material and instructions) of people with CP with those of their parents, known as whole-exome sequencing analysis. If a participant with CP has children of their own, then researchers will track changes in the genome of multiple generations of the same family, which will be a first for clinicians. 

Until recently, CP was not known to have a genetic connection. Yet, increasingly research indicates that as many as one in four individuals may have a genetic cause for their CP.  

“Dogma in medicine is hard to change,” admits Kruer. Yet he remains optimistic that perceptions can gradually shift with sound research. Indeed, initial research linking genes to CP is already opening doors to new avenues of treatment for patients. 

“The most cutting-edge genetic technologies are exciting, but it’s only one side of the coin,” he continues. “If you don’t know how that technology relates to a real person and his or her symptoms, what they’ve gone through etc., then I think it’s an incomplete picture.” 

Dr. Kruer will share why genetics matter and detail the specifics of his latest study during a MyCP webinar this evening (Wednesday, March 10) at 8 pm EST. You can register here

If your family is interested in taking part, look for an invitation from your CP clinic at one of the participating sites. We will send you an invitation to our online consent application. Once the family gives their consent, they will receive saliva-based DNA sample collection kits. 

Dr. Michael Kruer

Tune in to our next webinar — Genetic causes of cerebral palsy

We will kick off our ground-breaking “Genetic Causes of Cerebral Palsy” study with an informative MyCP webinar next Wednesday, March 10, at 8 pm EST. 

Dr. Michael Kruer, pediatric neurologist at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, studies the genetic causes of CP.

Dr. Michael Kruer, a neurogeneticist and pediatric movement disorders neurologist at Phoenix Children’s Hospital, will lead the study after receiving CPRN’s first publicly funded (NIH) grant to study the genetic causes of CP. 

Clinicians are hopeful that improved detection of a genetics origin for patients with CP will help individuals to gain treatments tailored to their unique situations faster and more efficiently. 

During the webinar, Dr Kruer will outline the function of the study as well as the types of findings that may be discovered and how those results may impact treatments. 

Three centers in the Cerebral Palsy Research Network will initially participate in the study; Phoenix Children’s Hospital, AZ, AI duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, DE, and Seattle Children’s Hospital, WA.  Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, OH, and Colorado Children’s in Denver, CO, have also expressed interest in participating. Other centers will be added during the course of the enrollment period that is set to end in 2023.

Dr. Kruer previously gave an overview of his research during a MyCP webinar in July 2020   Now, as he prepares to launch the study, he will share why genetics matter and detail recent findings about how genes play a role in the cause of CP. He will also outline who is eligible and how DNA samples will be collected. 

CP families receiving consultations at participating CPRN centers will be invited to enroll in whole exome sequencing analysis for the study which will examine the genetic factors between CP children and their parents. A hospital clinic visit is not necessary to enroll. Participants are required to have a diagnosis of CP. 

If you are not already signed up to view the MyCP webinar series, you can register here

Research CP Dystonia Edition

Don’t miss our 2021 MyCP Webinar Series!

Last year, more than 1,000 people logged on for our MyCP webinar series as we came together as a community to discuss cerebral palsy (CP) research. We are thrilled to announce our webinar series will return in 2021 with our first installment, Research CP: Dystonia Edition Results, scheduled for Tuesday, February 9, at 8 p.m. EST. 

Research CP embodies our efforts to engage stakeholders — community members, advocates, clinician and researchers — to set a research agenda that matters to the community.  It began in 2017 with our inaugural effort to establish the top research questions valued by the community. The result was published in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology in 2018 and has set the research agenda for the CP Research Network.  In 2019, we launched Research CP: Dystonia Edition. We engaged more 160 people in educational webinars on the topic, community members and clinicians generated a prioritized list of unanswered questions about dystonia in CP

The Research CP: Dystonia Edition Results webinar is the summary of our findings from this initiative to set a patient-centered research agenda for dystonia in CP. It will be presented by CP Research Network Chief Executive Officer Paul Gross, Bhooma Aravamuthan, MD, DPhil, a pediatric neurologist from St. Louis Children’s Hospital in Missouri, Darcy Fehlings, MD, a developmental pediatrician from Holland Bloorview Rehabilitation Hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and Michael Kruer, MD, a pediatric neurologist and neurogeneticist from Phoenix Children’s Hospital in Arizona.

To find out more, please visit our MyCP Webinar Series page and follow the instructions to sign up and secure your Zoom link to the online event. Webinars will also be recorded for later viewing.

Throughout 2021, we will bring you eleven monthly webinars featuring principal investigators from the CP Research Network, sharing concepts, development, and goals from their network research.  We will cover a broad spectrum of CP research ranging from genetics to care of adults with CP. The webinars are available for free to all CPRN community members and clinicians.

We encourage all who have participated in this important ongoing process to attend. We hope to see you there!

Image of a person holding a tool

Webinar: Body Composition and Strength in Cerebral Palsy

Ed Hurvitz, MD, Chair of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan

Ed Hurvitz, MD, Chair of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) announced that its next webinar in its MyCP webinar series would be about importance of body composition and strength in cerebral palsy (CP) on Monday, December 7, at 8 pm ET. Dr. Edward Hurvitz, Chairman of the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Michigan will discuss his research into new measurements of strength for people with CP and role that strength plays in long term health. Dr. Hurvitz, also a member of the CPRN Executive Committee, will present for approximately 20 minutes and be available for Q&A after the presentation. Dr. Hurvitz’s research was recently funded by the Foundation for Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Gabriella Molnar grant. This study is important because it may enable new standardized ways to measure strength in the CP population that can be easily added to routine care.

Interested participants need to register for the webinar to be sent instructions for joining. Webinars will be recorded and posted for later viewing. The MyCP Webinar series includes one presentation per month on different aspects of CPRN’s research studies. Please join us!

Genes and Cerebral Palsy

Genes and Cerebral Palsy

Michael Kruer, MD
Michael Kruer, MD

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) researcher Michael Kruer MD, a movement disorders pediatric neurologist and geneticist at the University of Arizona, was published last month in Nature Genetics for his work on the discovery of genes that may cause cerebral palsy (CP) by impairing the wiring of brain signals during early development.  These findings support the need for broader research being conducted by Dr. Kruer and CPRN. The early study of these genes led to treatment changes in some patients.

The published paper was based on genetic sequencing from 250 parent and child combinations (trios).  The CPRN study, led by Dr. Kruer and funding by the National Institutes of Health, will allow the analysis of a rich set of patient characteristics captured in the CPRN CP Registry in conjunction with genomic analyses for 500 additional trios. The findings from this study hold the promise to improve diagnoses and treatments for children with CP. Identifying genetic causes is key to providing personalized or precision medicine which will help tailor interventions for people with CP to enable more effective treatments.

When asked to explain the significance of these findings, Dr. Kruer said, “this study is the first firm statistical and laboratory evidence that a substantial proportion of CP cases are caused by genetic mutations; findings indicate CP genes don’t map to clotting and inflammation but more to early brain development; although brain wiring is complex, findings suggest new targeted therapies for CP are possible (rather than focusing simply on reducing symptoms as is current paradigm); early experience indicates that for some participants, genetic findings directly changed their clinical management (avoiding complication, reaching for best treatment first, or even prompting a completely new treatment that would not otherwise have been tried).”

 

 

We look forward to beginning to enroll patients from the CPRN CP Registry into this study in the coming months.

 

Dr. Ed Hurvitz, Chair of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, University of Michigan

CPRN Investigator Funded for Feasibility Study

CPRN Investigator Funded for Feasibility Study

Ed Hurvitz, MD, Chair of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan

Edward A. Hurvitz MD of Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan and Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) Executive Committee, was awarded the Foundation for Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Gabriella Molnar grant for a project entitled “Feasibility of Adding Grip Strength Measures to Body Composition Assessments in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy.”  The aim of the project is to test the feasibility of adding measures such as waist-hip circumference, skinfold measures, and grip strength to a regular clinic appointment for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) from age 8 through adulthood, and then potentially as data points in the CPRN CP Registry.  The Michigan Adults with Pediatric Onset Disabilities research group has published extensively on chronic disease risk in adults with CP.  Body composition and grip strength are well documented indicators for risk of morbidity and mortality in typical developing populations, and obesity has been associated with risk of multi-morbidity in adults with CP, including young adults between ages 18-40.  The study will also include a history of chronic disease with an exploratory aim to correlate body composition and hand grip findings to history. 

CPRN congratulates Dr. Hurvitz and his colleagues for their success in funding this research which was originally approved as a concept for CPRN in April 2019. This study addresses top priorities from Research CP, including the study of the effects of aging with cerebral palsy as well as laying the groundwork to do studies of exercise strategies to promote better health outcomes.  Co-investigators on the study include Drs. Mark Peterson, Dan Whitney, Heidi Haapala, Mary Schmidt, Angeline Bowman and Jessica Pruente. The funding amount is $10,000 dollars, to be used for measurement equipment and research assistance.  The start date is December 1, and the study is planned for 18 months.