Research presents cerebral palsy research updates, funding and funding opportunities, as well as new publications and the information offered within them, to keep the cerebral palsy community informed. Learn how you can be a part of the conversations by joining MyCP, an interactive cerebral palsy community forum, today!

MyCP Webinar: What is CPChecklist?

Unni G. Narayanan, MBBS, M.Sc., FRCS(C). A headshot of a broadly smiling man with short silver hair wearing a dark suit.

Dr. Unni Narayanan has created two leading outcome measures for children with ambulatory and non ambulatory cerebral palsy — the Gait Outcomes Assessment List (GOAL) and Caregiver Priorities & Child Health Index of Life with Disabilities (CPCHILD).

Dr. Unni Narayanan, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon and outcomes researcher, will share his vision for helping parents manage the health outcomes for children with severe (non-ambulatory) CP which is called CPCHECKlist©. The webinar will take place on Monday, May 16 at 8 PM ET and parents, caregivers or clinicians should register in advance to receive an invitation. Dr. Narayanan is the creator of the CPCHILD which is the leading outcome measure for health-related quality of life for children with severe CP.

Cerebral Palsy Co-morbidities and a Health Tech Evaluation Checklist (CPCHECKlist©) is a new parent-reported list of specific health items and co-morbidities, commonly experienced by children with severe cerebral palsy (CP) and CP-like conditions. In addition to reporting the presence and perceived severity of each health issue, the parent/caregiver also indicates which of these they wish to have addressed at any given clinical encounter. The CPCHECKList includes a section on the use of health-technologies. The CPCHECKlist is intended to serve as a companion health module of the CPCHILD questionnaire or as a stand-alone health/comorbidity index to guide clinical decision-making or to quantify the health status of a child with severe CP in a standardized, comprehensive way for research and clinical management.

Please join us to learn about this important new tool which will help parents manage the care of their children. Dr. Narayanan will be available for live Q&A directly following this presentation. MyCP Webinar Series registrants will receive an email with login details and a recording will be posted within 24 hours.

A cartoon depicts people running and a man rolling quickly in a wheelchair to reach 60 miles for cerebral palsy

60 Mile Challenge for CP Research

A young girl in a brown knit hat takes steps in her walker.

Join us for the 60 Mile Challenge for CP

Join us this May in rallying support for the cerebral palsy (CP) community and our research work at the CP Research Network with the 60 Mile Challenge for CP Research! This peer-to-peer fundraiser is a great way to raise awareness for CP and provide a way for your friends and family to improve the lives of people with CP by raising money for our national research efforts. You can join the challenge on Facebook and raise money there or, if your are not active on Facebook, on our 60 Mile Challenge event website. And you can clock your miles any way you see fit – Fitbit, wheelchair odometer, Strava, phone app, whatever works for you and how you move! You can create a team, do it solo or just support someone else that is doing it. Share your progress on Facebook to get support for your efforts!

 

A young woman with cerebral palsy in a hat and shorts using arm crutches leans on a tree during a hike.

You can go solo or start a team or just support someone else who is doing the 60 Mile Challenge!

The 60 Mile Challenge for CP Research is the first in a series of peer-to-peer fundraising activities that we will conduct this year. Our goal is to raise funds to support our expanding research agenda to answer critical questions in the care of children and adults with CP. The CP Research Network is the largest and most comprehensive collaboration of hospitals and community members working together to improve health outcomes for people with CP. We host the largest community and clinical registries in the US to gather robust and comprehensive data for research. We focus our research and consumer educational content on the health and wellness outcomes that people with cerebral palsy value most.

Please join us this May for the 60 Mile Challenge for CP Research!

Headshot of Dr. Adam Ostendorf for his webinar on cerebral palsy and epilepsy

Update on Epilepsy and Cerebral Palsy

A headshot of Adam Ostendorf, M.D. A smiling man with short brown hair wearing a black suit and red tie.

Dr. Adam Ostendorf will present the CP Research Network findings about people with CP and epilepsy.

Our April MyCP webinar, next Tuesday, April 19, at 8 pm ET, will provide an overview of our initial findings about people with epilepsy and cerebral palsy (CP). The webinar will feature Adam Ostendorf, MD, a pediatric neurologist from Nationwide Children’s Hospital, who is the principal investigator of our epilepsy research within the network. Dr. Ostendorf has used the CPRN Registry and validated outcome measures, to learn more about the quality of life for people with CP and epilepsy.

Dr. Ostendorf was funded by the Pediatric Epilepsy Research Foundation in 2018 to add epilepsy specific support into the CPRN Registry. Since that time, Nationwide and other centers with the CP Research Network, have been gathering data about the experience of children with epilepsy and CP and examining differences in treatment and outcomes for kids with epilepsy and CP versus those without CP. Dr. Ostendorf will share his findings and how these can lead to important research to improve outcomes for children with epilepsy and CP. His findings have ramifications for children and adults alike.

If you are interested in joining the webinar, you can register on our MyCP Webinar Series page. People who have registered for our whole series will receive a link to the webinar in email a few days prior. If you cannot attend live, we will post the webinar on our YouTube channel where subscribers will receive a notification that it is posted.

Dr. Aravamuthan, a doctor specializing in cerebral palsy, with dark hair back over her white lab coast smiling.

New Publication on Cerebral Palsy

Bhooma Aravamuthan, M.D., DPhil. A smiling woman with long dark hair is wearing black rimmed glasses and a white lab coat.

Dr. Aravamuthan has championed physicians sharing an etiologic diagnosis with a diagnosis of cerebral palsy.

The Cerebral Palsy (CP) Research Network congratulates investigator Bhooma Aravamuthan, MD, DPhil and her co-authors for the publication of her CP Research Network study entitled “Diagnostic preferences include discussion of etiology for adults with cerebral palsy and their caregivers.” The publication, released in the journal Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology in January 2022, describes the results of her survey of community members about the importance of understanding their possible etiologies (origins) of CP. The results of the study indicate that most community members with a diagnostic preference would want to know both their CP diagnosis and any information about their potential etiologic diagnoses.

Dr. Aravamuthan has been a strong advocate for shifting the practice of clinicians that make a CP diagnosis to include information that is important to families for numerous reasons. This article concludes that physicians should change practice to include all information about etiologic diagnoses with their CP diagnosis. This may include, in some situations, stating that the etiologies of a person’s CP are not known.

“Based on survey work we have done with clinicians, many tend to provide either a diagnosis of CP, or a diagnosis describing the etiology of CP, but not both,” said Dr. Aravamuthan, a pediatric movement disorders neurologist as Washington University in St. Louis. “But this study shows that families value the services and the sense of community of having both diagnoses when available.”

The red cover of Developmental Medicine and Children Neurology journal

The full journal article is available to subscribers to DMCN. MyCP members can click on the journal cover to go to the page to view the pre-approved version of the article.

We have made the article in its pre-approved state available to members of the MyCP community. As with many academic publications, this article is not available for free for the general public but the journal allows for authors to post pre-approved versions. MyCP members can find the article in our CPRN Private Archive. Interested community members can join MyCP for free to access this article and other services such as personalized resource recommendations and free adaptive fitness programs.

A bar chart shows the age bands and totals for people with cerebral palsy in our national registry.

Cerebral Palsy Registry Update

Headshot of Garey Noritz, M.D. Go to Gary Noritz’s profile

Dr. Noritz, a developmental pediatrician and internal medicine physician, will provide an overview of the current CPRN cerebral palsy registry.

Next Tuesday, March 29, at 8 pm ET, Garey Noritz, MD, the principal investigator of the Cerebral Palsy Research Network’s cerebral palsy registry, will present the latest findings from our registry for our next MyCP webinar. He is a developmental pediatrician and an internal medicine physician at Nationwide Children’s Hospital who treats children and adults with CP. The presentation is open to the public and characterizes the patient population – children through adults – that are captured in our national registry. Attendees will learn how the CP Research Network registry collects data and how that data is used to accelerate research. He will also share what we have learned about the more than 5,200 patients enrolled in the registry.

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network was founded out of a need identified by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to establish a national registry for cerebral palsy (CP). Unlike countries with socialized medicine such as Australia or Sweden, surveillance of CP at a national level in the United States is exceedingly difficult and prohibitively expensive. The CP Research Network chose to build a “clinical” registry rather than a surveillance registry with the main difference being a focus on children and adults who were treated for CP rather than only whether they were born with CP. A clinical registry is an essential tool for planning research for CP, providing preliminary data to increase research funding success, and improving the treatments and outcomes for people with the condition.

MyCP webinar subscribers will automatically receive an email with the link to the webinar. If you are interested in joining this webinar or signing up for our series, register at: https://cprn.org/mycp-webinar-series/. If you cannot make the webinar, we will post a recording on our website and on our YouTube channel.

Dr. Kristie Bjornson in a bright green CPRN shirt and holding an orthotic.

CP Research Network Hires Scientific Director

Kristie Bjornson, PT, PhD. A smiling woman with blond hair, wearing a black vest over maroon turtleneck in a hospital hallway.

Kristie Bjornson, PT, PhD, MS, has been hired by the CP Research Network to be the Scientific Director.

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network hired Kristie Bjornson, PT, PhD, MS to lead its scientific direction. Dr. Bjornson, featured in our CP Stories in April 2021, is a leader in the field of research for cerebral palsy. In her new role, Dr. Bjornson will lead the network’s effort to pursue public funding from granting agencies such as the National Institutes of Health, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute and the National Institute on Disability Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research. Dr. Bjornson brings multi-center clinical trial experience for various interventions for CP (i.e. surgery, injections, orthoses, and rehabilitation).

“I’m excited to merge my experience in clinical research in cerebral palsy with the power of the network,” said Dr. Bjornson. “There are so many important to questions to answer for our community and the network is a highly efficient way to conduct this research.”

In addition to her role as Scientific Director, Dr. Bjornson will continue as a site principal investigator for Seattle Children’s Hospital (SCH) where her first-hand experience with our registry will be invaluable to our future research endeavors as she has real world experience with how the registry can be used to make clinical research more effective. Under her leadership, SCH has become a significant contributor to the richness of data in the network’s cerebral palsy registry as SCH has enrolled its entire CP population. Understanding and leveraging the registry to plan new research studies is a great strength that Dr. Bjornson brings to the network.

Happy New Year 2022 from the CP Research Network with a black background and fireworks in the corners

Happy New Year from the CP Research Network

At the Cerebral Palsy Research Network, we have a lot to be thankful for.  You, our great extended cerebral palsy (CP) community, helped us achieve our fundraising goal of $10,000 this past month for our MyCP webinar series in 2022.  With our board of directors’ matching, we raised more than $30,000 for our network! We are excited to bring our MyCP webinar series back in full swing next week beginning with a live interview of the authors of Pure Grit (details to come out tomorrow).  Thank you to all who contributed and helped to spread the word!

2021 in Review

Last year was transformative in numerous ways for the CP Research Network.  We kicked off the year with the announcement of our merger with CP NOW. The combination of their educational and wellness programming with our efforts led to significant accomplishments including:

 

Our Research and Quality Improvement initiatives made significant progress in both seeking to answer key research questions about CP and improving the treatment of people with CP now.  A few highlights include:

What’s new for 2022?

We have a lot of projects that will culminate in 2022! These include multiple publications of our work in leading journals, partnerships to sustain and grow our wellbeing offerings, continued progress on our research and quality initiatives, and the return of our MyCP webinar series to name a few.

There are lots of ways to stay engaged with us.

Please consider one of these:

All the best to you and the entire CP community for 2022!

 

 

 

 

Dr. Bhooma Aravamuthan, pictured in a white lab coat and dark rimmed glasses, will speak about dystonia in CP

Update on Dystonia in Cerebral Palsy

On Thursday, December 9, at 8 pm ET, the CP Research Network will hold its final MyCP webinar for 2021 to provide an update on our work in dystonia in cerebral palsy. Bhooma Aravamuthan, MD, DPhil, a pediatric movement disorders neurologist at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, and a leader in the network, will present an update on our progress in this important area of research and care.

In 2019, the Cerebral Palsy (CP) Research Network started an effort to build a community centered research agenda for dystonia in CP. Dr. Darcy Fehlings had found that dystonia was significantly under diagnosed in the CP population and that as much as 80% of the people with CP had some degree of dystonia in addition to spasticity.[ref] The presence of dystonia can be challenging and painful for people and often requires different approaches to treatment. Parents expressed frustration in getting an accurate diagnosis that allowed their children get relief from these symptoms. The CP Research Network developed Research CP Dystonia Edition to engage the extended community – caregivers, people with CP, and clinicians – in a dialogue about the most pressing issues needing research in dystonia in CP.

Dr. Aravamuthan leads our quality improvement effort focused on increasing practitioner awareness of dystonia screening for every person with CP. She will describe how this effort addresses a key priority set forth in Research CP Dystonia Edition. She will also describe research concepts that she is developing to directly engage the community to advance dystonia diagnosis. Please join us for the webinar next Thursday evening by signing up at https://cprn.org/mycp-webinar-series/.

A blond woman kneels while speaking with her daughter braided hair in a wheelchair.

Results: Communication and Participation in CP

Kristen Allison, PhD, CCC-SLP. A smiling woman with long blond hair wearing earrings and a light grey sweater.

Kristen Allison, PhD, CCC-SLP, an Assistant Professor at Northeastern, is this month’s featured speaker for the MyCP Webinar Series, presenting the results of her recent study in speech and language for children with CP.

Next Wednesday, November 17, at 8 pm, Kristen Allison, PhD, CCC-SLP, will present the results of her study of Speech and Language Predictors of Participation in Children with Cerebral Palsy, as part of the CP Research Network’s MyCP Webinar series. Dr. Allison received our Research CP grant award in 2019 for her study investigating how speech and language capability affect a child’s quality of life in terms of participation in activities. Attendees of this webinar will learn what she discovered and be able to participate in a live Q&A with Dr. Allison.

“We found that several aspects of a child’s speech and language skills affect how often they participate and how involved they are in social activities.” said Dr. Allison. “Our results highlight just how important effective communication is to quality of life for children with CP!”

Dr. Allison is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders and the director of the Speech Motor Impairment & Learning (SMILe) Lab at Northeastern University. The study was hosted and distributed through th CP Research Network Community Registry and data collection was completed in 2020. Dr. Allison will not only share the results of the study but talk about its meaning for both parents of children with CP, but also how the data will be used to inform future research questions.

Community members interesting in learning about the results of Dr. Allison’s research can sign up to receive webinar login instructions. People who have already registered for the whole MyCP webinar series will be sent an invitation with login details prior to the webinar. Note: Our MyCP webinar series now require a Zoom account to sign in. You can get a free Zoom account here.

October 6 is World CP Day - Millioins of Reasons to Spread the Word

CP Research Network Featured at AACPDM

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network was invited alongside of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), and C-Progress to teach early-stage investigators how to establish a successful research program at their institution during the annual meeting of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM). The nine-hour pre-conference tutorial featured presentations from each of these research and funding organizations to emphasize key steps for an investigator to get funding. The CP Research Network is differentiated from its co-presenters by being an organization that facilitates and conducts research.

In addition to presenting the network’s programs, registries, and tools, CEO Paul Gross held a breakout session for Q&A with interested attendees. “It was an honor to present our mission and vision alongside the largest public funders for research – NIH and PCORI,” said Gross. “The attendees also heard from Dr. Michael Kruer about his experience working with the CP Research Network to gain $3M in funding from NIH for his genetic causes of CP study.”

This pre-conference session fell on October 6 – World CP Day – when the CP Research Network Board of Directors has offered to match donations two-fold! World CP Day creates awareness about CP and much needed research around the globe. We are excited to be part of accelerating that research by educating new investigators to the field.