Dr. Wade Shrader of Nemours/AI duPoint, smiling in a blue suit, will present on the importance of hip surveillance

Webinar on Hip Surveillance and CP

Dr. Wade Shrader of Nemours/AI duPoint, smiling in a blue suit, is an orthopedic surgeon who leads the CP program at Nemours

Dr. Shrader, an orthopedic surgeon, leads the hip surveillance initiative for the CP Research Network.

After taking a break during the last month of summer, our MyCP webinar series will resume on Wednesday, September 29 at 8 pm ET with a presentation on our hip research program. Hip pain is the most frequent cause of pain in children with cerebral palsy and can cause problems with mobility and range of motion. We have begun a hip surveillance program at our the CP Research Network centers to proactively address this issue—a very challenging task to undertake. Our upcoming webinar will feature Dr. Wade Shrader, a pediatric orthopedic surgeon and Division Chief of Cerebral Palsy at Nemours/AI duPont Hospital in Wilmington, DE who leads this effort for the network. He is also the parent of four children, two of whom are adults with CP.

In order to protect the hips of children with CP, the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Development Medicine (AACPDM) released an updated “care pathway” recommending the frequency and techniques for monitoring the hip health of children with CP in June 2018. Care pathways combine the latest evidence-based medicine and expert opinion to provide guidance on how to treat complex conditions. Dr. Shrader will discuss the anatomy of childrens’ hips, the impact of CP, the importance of monitoring hips, and how parents and caregivers can advocate for their child’s hip health.

“I know first-hand as a Dad how tough recovery from hip reconstruction surgery can be, “ said Dr. Shrader. “I’m looking forward to talking with the CPRN community about hip issues in Cerebral Palsy, and to give my perspective as both a pediatric orthopedic surgeon and a family member.”

Community members and clinicians interested in the webinar can sign up on cprn.org. MyCP members and series registrants will receive the Zoom link automatically prior to the webinar. Join us!

CPRN’s progress as a Learning Health Network is published!

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network’s progress as a Learning Health Network (LHN) has been published in the Journal for Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine this past week.

Primary author Amy Bailes, PT, PhD, published a self-assessment from leaders in the Cerebral Palsy Research Network using a tool developed by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital called the Network Maturity Grid (NMG).[1] The NMG is used to detail the maturation of necessary infrastructure and processes to create learning networks (LNs).

Bailes’ publication, the fourth since the CP Research Network’s inception six years ago, provides a glimpse into future directions for the network’s development. It details a standardizing scoring rubric used to assess progress across six domains including:

  • Systems of Leadership
  • Governance and Management
  • Quality Improvement
  • Engagement of Stakeholders
  • Data and Analytics
  • Research

The results were tabulated and graphed to provide insights into progress in each domain and areas for improvement.

The CP Research Network’s leadership team amalgamated this analysis to identify key investments that will improve our network maturity over the next five years. Moving forward, these investments will be centered on leadership development, financial sustainability, quality improvement training, the capture of patient-reported outcomes, and enhancing the quality of data collection.

The purple cover of the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine has its title and graphics of children playing, a person in a wheelchair, walkers and helping hands inside of green, pink and orange circles.

The cover of the Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine.

The Network will incorporate the NMG tool into annual planning. Investments will be measured over the course of a five-year strategic plan for 2021-2025.

Members of the professional and academic community can access the article online with a Journal subscription. Community members may download the original article (prior to revisions required by the editors) from our website.

Dr. Amy Bailes webinar on what is a learning health network.

What is a Learning Health Network – and why should you care?

Amy Bailes, PT, PhD

Amy Bailes, PT, PhD

On Monday, June 21, at 8 pm ET, we invite you to tune in for our next MyCP Webinar, to discover why the Cerebral Palsy Research Network is working to become a learning health network and how doing so will enhance our efforts to improve health outcomes.

The webinar will be presented by Amy Bailes PT PhD, leader of the CP Research Network’s quality improvement initiatives. She will outline how learning networks – that often form a registry at their core – can quickly gather and share data that rapidly improve treatment experiences for patients.

During the 40 minute webinar, Dr. Bailes, a physical therapist and researcher at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, will also outline the CP Research Network’s efforts to become a learning health network and how that ties in to clinical initiatives we already have underway.

“Taking the most effective practices from the best CP centers across the nation and spreading those practices in a systematic fashion, will have profound impact on the health of people with CP,” says Dr. Bailes. “This is how we should be caring for all people with CP.”

Learning health networks seek to improve outcomes through a combination of research and quality improvement (QI) initiatives. While some research studies can take years to complete and can require more time to affect a change in practice, QI initiatives can drive systemic change and bring results as early as six months.

“While QI cannot answer fundamental questions about treatment effectiveness or discover new therapeutic interventions, it can be used to dramatically improve health outcomes very rapidly,” says Paul Gross, President and Chief Executive Officer of CP Research Network.

Members of the community, clinicians and researchers interested in learning more about the CP Research Network’s drive to become a learning health network can tune in to the June 21 webinar by registering on the sidebar at the top (or on the MyCP Webinar Registration page).

CPRN Annual Investigators Meeting, 2021

Annual Conference Sparks Innovation and New Research Ideas

Forty-five clinicians from 28 academic medical centers came together on Zoom last month for the Cerebral Palsy Research Network’s fourth annual investigator conference.

Marc Randolph, cofounder and original CEO of Netflix

The two-day online gathering featured keynote speaker Marc Randolph, the co-founder and first CEO of Netflix, who shared pearls of wisdom on decision-making and growth to our diverse audience of research leaders.

Participants, including clinicians from the National Institutes of Health, discussed a range of network studies, including the relevance of genetics in cerebral palsy diagnosis, and brainstormed potential new areas in dystonia research and building capacity to care for adults with CP. 

The meeting also enabled the CPRN team to define goals for an updated 2021-2025 strategic plan, including expanding leadership systems, ensuring financial sustainability, engaging community members, and strengthening research and quality improvement projects. 

“This year, we were able to make extensive use of breakout rooms for discussions and collaborations among smaller groups of investigators,” says CPRN President and Chief Executive Officer Paul Gross. “We were fortunate to have support from the Weinberg Family Center for Cerebral Palsy, making for smooth logistics.”  

Moving to a virtual format proved to be a successful venture with the format and progress of CPRN’s 2021 conference receiving praise from the attendees.

“It was great,” wrote Dr. Ed Hurvitz, chair of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Michigan. “The best Zoom meeting of the year for content, for career development, and being able to connect a bit with friends old and new.”

Paralympian, advocate, and community advisor Duncan Wyeth, also in attendance, remarked: “I have acquired more knowledge and insight over two half-days about my disability and potential system mechanisms to address that disability than at any other time in my life. This meeting gives me great hope and expectations for the countless individuals who will know an enhanced quality of life because of this learning network.” 

Thank you to everyone who gave their time for this important conference. It has set us on an excellent trajectory for 2021 and beyond. We greatly appreciate the commitment of our dedicated investigator team and all their hard work advancing the care of people with CP.