Cerebral Palsy Research Network Blog

Archive for News – Page 2

Webinar: Patient Reported Outcomes and Shared Decision Making

Unni Narayanan, MD, MSc
Dr. Unni Narayanan is a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at SickKids

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) announced that its next webinar in its MyCP Webinar Series will feature Unni Narayanan, MD, MSc who is a pediatric orthopedic surgeon at SickKids in Toronto, Canada on Monday, August 17, at 8 pm ET. The topic is “Can we make patient reported outcome measures useful to patients and parents?” Dr. Narayanan has developed several patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures to assess the effectiveness of surgical interventions in cerebral palsy (CP). Now his research is seeking to determine if those PROs can be used to facilitate a shared decision making between patients/caregivers and clinicians. Shared decision making is a process by which clinicians and patients or caregivers collaborate to understand the evidence base behind interventions and the tradeoffs between interventions or alternatives to surgeries and medications. Shared decision making is very important in CP because most surgeries are elective. Dr. Narayanan will present his recently funded research project being done in conjunction with CPRN and then take questions from attendees. The presentation will be approximately 20 minutes followed by an open ended Q&A.

Parents, caregivers and adults with CP can access the PROs developed by Dr. Narayanan by joining MyCP.org where they can be found in the CPRN Community Registry. After completing one of these measures, you can print out the results to share them with your CP physician and facilitate the shared decision making process now!

Interested participants need to register for the webinar to be sent instructions for joining.  Webinars will be recorded and posted for later viewing.  The MyCP Webinar series includes one presentation per month on different aspects of CPRN’s research studies.  Please join us!

Columbia’s Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center Joins CPRN

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) announced that the Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center (WFCPC) from Columbia University’s Irving Medical Center has joined the network.  The WFCPC is CPRN’s first site in New York City and provides a large and diverse patient population, including children and adults, for the studies conducted by CPRN.  The participation in CPRN, led by Jason Carmel, MD, PhD, includes an interdisciplinary team from orthopedic surgery, rehabilitation medicine, neurology and other clinical disciplines contributing patient and intervention data to the CPRN Cerebral Palsy (CP) Registry.

The Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center is dedicated to improving the quality of life for people of all ages living with CP by providing comprehensive care, conducting groundbreaking research, and educating medical professionals, patients, and caregivers about the latest advances in cerebral palsy care. Members of the Weinberg CP Center team conducted over 3,700 patient encounters in 2019. Pediatric and adult services include orthopedics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, neurology, genetics, and mental health, along with social work and care coordination services. In conjunction with its clinical care mission, the Center’s academic efforts strive to bridge basic science and clinical research to directly impact the lives of patients living with cerebral palsy.

 “The goals and values of the CPRN are perfectly aligned with those of the Weinberg CP Center, and the CPRN is an incredible resource for multidisciplinary research and collaboration,” said Dr. Jason Carmel. “Our team is excited to begin contributing to the CPRN’s efforts, as well as participate in projects and initiatives that will undoubtably lead to a better understanding of how we can improve the lives of our patients.”

Knowledge Translation Tuesday: SDR for Adults

River Shannon trail in Limerick, Ireland
River Shannon trail in Limerick, Ireland

(This post in first in a series of knowledge translation posts that will be provided by our new guest author, Lily Collison). I’m Lily, mother of Tommy who is now aged 26. Tommy grew up in Ireland, studied journalism at New York University, and now lives in San Francisco where he works at Lambda School (an online coding school). Tommy has spastic diplegia, GMFCS level II. I recently published Spastic Diplegia–Bilateral Cerebral Palsy in conjunction with Gillette Children’s Healthcare Press. The book is a mixture of detailed medical information combined with a personal story, and all proceeds go to cerebral palsy (CP) research. I’m now going to be a guest author for the Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN).

In February of this year Tommy had selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) at Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare, in Minnesota. SDR is a neurosurgical procedure that reduces spasticity by selectively cutting abnormal sensory nerve rootlets in the spinal cord. This procedure is mostly carried out in children and to a much smaller extent in adults. Recent research carried out by CPRN showed that 5% of those who have SDR were over 18 years. Tommy is therefore one of the minority of people who have SDR in adulthood. Over the next few weeks, I’ll write about SDR in adulthood and Tommy will also contribute (when he gets a break from working and rehabbing 🙂)

At this stage Tommy has a thick patient file at Gillette. At age nine he had single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) to address muscle and bone problems that had developed as he grew. At age sixteen he had orthopedic surgery to address knee pain, and at age eighteen a further minor orthopedic surgery. The possibility of SDR was first raised in Fall 2019, at a routine orthopedic appointment with Dr. Novacheck, Tommy’s orthopedic surgeon at Gillette for many years. A multi-disciplinary appointment was organized for December with consultants from neurosurgery, physical medicine and rehabilitation (PM&R), and orthopedics to evaluate Tommy’s suitability for SDR. The clinicians agreed that Tommy was a suitable candidate, and Tommy agreed to proceed with the surgery. SDR was carried out in February of this year, right before COVID caused widespread shutdown in March.

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Do you have questions for me about this post? I’m available on the MyCP.org forum (you will need to join MyCP if you are not a member) to discuss it.