Cerebral Palsy Research Network Blog

Archive for News – Page 2

CPRN Investigator Funded for Feasibility Study

Ed Hurvitz, MD, Chair of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan
Ed Hurvitz, MD, Chair of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation, University of Michigan

Edward A. Hurvitz MD of Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan and Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) Executive Committee, was awarded the Foundation for Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Gabriella Molnar grant for a project entitled “Feasibility of Adding Grip Strength Measures to Body Composition Assessments in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy.”  The aim of the project is to test the feasibility of adding measures such as waist-hip circumference, skinfold measures, and grip strength to a regular clinic appointment for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) from age 8 through adulthood, and then potentially as data points in the CPRN CP Registry.  The Michigan Adults with Pediatric Onset Disabilities research group has published extensively on chronic disease risk in adults with CP.  Body composition and grip strength are well documented indicators for risk of morbidity and mortality in typical developing populations, and obesity has been associated with risk of multi-morbidity in adults with CP, including young adults between ages 18-40.  The study will also include a history of chronic disease with an exploratory aim to correlate body composition and hand grip findings to history. 

CPRN congratulates Dr. Hurvitz and his colleagues for their success in funding this research which was originally approved as a concept for CPRN in April 2019. This study addresses top priorities from Research CP, including the study of the effects of aging with cerebral palsy as well as laying the groundwork to do studies of exercise strategies to promote better health outcomes.  Co-investigators on the study include Drs. Mark Peterson, Dan Whitney, Heidi Haapala, Mary Schmidt, Angeline Bowman and Jessica Pruente. The funding amount is $10,000 dollars, to be used for measurement equipment and research assistance.  The start date is December 1, and the study is planned for 18 months.

How CPRN built its Cerebral Palsy Registry

CPRN Registry Described in the Archives of Rehabilitation Research & Clinical Translation

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) announced that its third publication entitled “Cerebral Palsy Research Network Clinical Registry: Methodology and Baseline Report” was published in Archives of Rehabilitation Research and Clinical Translation this past week.  The publication is “open access” meaning that anyone from the cerebral palsy (CP) community can read the article free of charge.  The article, authored by the founding members of the CPRN Executive Committee, describes the creation of the CPRN Registry from a process perspective – who was involved, what were the objectives and how and why were the data elements chosen for inclusion in the registry.

In addition to defining the process, the article also provides a baseline registry report for the first few years of data collection.  This preliminary report provides a descriptive analysis of the first 1858 patients – demographics, movement disorder, gross motor capabilities, and other clinical characteristics — included in the registry from eight sites.  Since this articled was drafted, the registry has grown to more than four thousand patients from 10 sites.  The registry is expected to continue to grow in step functions as more sites come online with their clinical practice supporting the registry.

The article also discusses how the CPRN registry uniquely leverages hospital electronic medical records (EMR) systems to include large volumes of data without burdening clinicians.  The CPRN registry database has been built into Epic – one of the leading EMR systems.  Development is underway for Cerner – another leading EMR system. The discussion section of the article also compares the focus of the CPRN Registry to the Common Data Elements for CP as defined by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke in conjunction with the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine.

CPRN’s other publications can be found on our publications page.

CPRN Turns Five!

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN), founded in the summer of 2015, has reached its fifth anniversary. Born out of a 2014 workshop organized by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and first designed to achieve a national registry for cerebral palsy (CP), CPRN has emerged as a multi-focus initiative and one that has given rise to a lasting partnership between the community and clinician researchers to improve outcomes for people with CP.

A 5-year strategic plan created in 2016 led to the realization of the following major milestones:

  • Engagement of community, clinical and research stakeholders to set and prioritize a patient-centered research agenda. The engagement was accomplished through the establishment of a Community Advisory Committee and the execution of two patient-centered research setting initiatives called Research CP, the first of which was funded by the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). This research agenda guides CPRN’s research focus and is influenced, dynamically, via ongoing community engagement in MyCP.org which was launched in the spring of 2019.  MyCP.org is a web portal that provides the community with opportunities to engage in CP research by participating in surveys and/or discussions with clinicians and researchers.
  • Establishment of registry infrastructure to accelerate CP research. This infrastructure includes two registries: a clinical CP registry and a community CP registry. The clinical registry includes data from more than 4,000 patients from 17 enrolling centers and will grow as more of the 28 centers committed to hosting the registry contribute their patient data. The community registry, where community members register themselves and contribute their data and perspectives on CP, launched in 2019 with the inaugural annual survey of adults with CP.
  • Facilitation of multidisciplinary research collaboration. Clinician researchers from multiple disciplines and multiple centers are tackling pressing and patient-centered research questions and quality improvement initiatives designed to improve outcomes for persons with CP. CPRN has submitted multiple grants and has received funding from NIH, PCORI, non-governmental organizations and private foundations for projects such as studying epilepsy in CP, genetics in CP and speech and language predictors of participation in CP. CPRN has also internally funded five quality improvement initiatives: adult care, dystonia, hip health, intrathecal pump infections, and care transitions, all of which seek to rapidly change clinical processes to improve outcomes for persons with CP.

The next five years promise new centers joining CPRN, more data collection and contribution from existing centers, and the development of many new patient-centered research and quality improvement initiatives. The anticipated growth will advance our development as a Learning Health Network that continuously improves treatments and outcomes for CP through research and quality improvement. Our focus over the next five years will give us more ways to engage the CP community and enhance outcomes locally, nationally and internationally.