Resources for adults with cerebral palsy, such as research and educational presentations, plus an interactive forum you can join today!

 

Three photos show a woman in a wheelchair lifting weights, a nutritious meal and a peaceful day the beach

Free Mindfulness, Exercise, and Nutrition Course

A cutting board and knife are laid out with healthy ingredients and a fry pan.

One of the core curriculum of MENTOR is nutrition which is of greater importance for people with cerebral palsy for their daily and long term health.

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network has partnered with the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) to provide free virtual training classes on mindfulness, exercise and nutrition (MENTOR). NCHPAD is funded through a grant from the Centers for Disease Control to promote opportunities that are crucial to the health of people with a physical disability. The CP Research Network piloted the MENTOR program in April 2021 to provide feedback on the program for people with cerebral palsy (CP). NCHPAD was recently funded for the next five years and chose the CP Research Network as their partner for the CP community.

The MENTOR program is held over eight weeks for one hour a day. Classes meet virtually and have instructors from different disciplines to teach mindfulness, nutritional health and adaptive exercise. Some exercise equipment is provided free of charge. The classes offer optional add-on private coaching to tailor the content for the individual participating. The next class for people with CP will begin in April.

An informational webinar is being planned for February 23 at 4 pm ET with NCHPAD chief executive Dr. James Rimmer and past participants from the CP community. Adults with CP that are interested in learning more should visit our Cerebral Palsy Fitness page or send an email to mentor@cprn.org. Go to our MyCP webinar series page to sign up for the informational webinar.

A woman in a chair lifting weights, a girl swimming in a triathalon, a college graduate seeking work and triples in a swing.

Cerebral Palsy Awareness Photo Contest

Young man with cerebral palsy sits in his red walker, while facing the ocean on the sandy beach.In advance of Cerebral Palsy Awareness Month, which runs each year throughout the month of March, the Cerebral Palsy Research Network has launched a photo contest to highlight the lives and experiences of community members living with CP. The contest invites members of the community to submit up to five photos photos that depict their day-to-day life, adventures, challenges, joys, and journey. The CP Research Network has opened its gallery of submissions and will award $1,000 in cash prizes to five winners on March 25, 2022 – the day officially designated as National CP Awareness Day in the United States.

“We find that the CP community is underrepresented in so many forms of media today,” said Paul Gross, President and CEO of the CP Research Network. “As an example, stock photography agencies have very limited authentic photographs of the lived experience for people with CP.” The CP Awareness Photo Contest seeks to develop a rich set of authentic photos of people with CP that can be used in the CP Research Network’s growing cerebral palsy awareness campaigns for March and beyond!

The CP Awareness Photo Contest is opens today on CPRN.ORG. Contestants must be members of MyCP and may participate as an advocate, clinician, researcher or community member Prizes will be awarded as follows:

Category Prize
Creativity $100
Diversity $100
Participation and inclusion $100
Perseverance $100
Physical activity $100
Best Overall $500

Winners will be chosen via a combination of votes and final selection by the CP Research Network. Contestants must sign a photo release as part of the entry process. Photos will be displayed on CPRN.ORG and CP Research Network social media channels. Detailed rules for entries can be found on the photo contest rules page. Dig through your archives or snap a new picture and submit it soon!

Webinar: Intrathecal Baclofen Pump Complications

Robert Bollo, MD, with a shaved head and a smile, in a dark suit, white shirt and red striped tie

Dr. Robert Bollo will present on the CP Research Network’s efforts to reduce the most common complication with intrathecal baclofen pumps.

Our next MyCP webinar is Thursday, January 27, at 8 PM ET and will be about our efforts to improve outcomes for intrathecal baclofen pumps (ITB). ITB pumps are commonly used to treat spasticity in people with cerebral palsy. Our featured speaker will be Robert Bollo, MD, a pediatric neurosurgeon from the University of Utah. The webinar and open Q&A with Dr. Bollo will last one hour.

Dr. Bollo will present an overview of the use of ITB pumps in the management of spasticity and common post-surgical complications with ITB pumps. He is leading a quality improvement (QI) initiative (study to improve outcomes) in the CP Research Network to monitor the most common complication of baclofen pumps – post surgical infections. ITB pump infections are common but estimates of infection rates in the literature vary widely with an average of 10%[refs] of all implantations.

Interested participants need to register in advance. Members of the MyCP webinar series will be emailed a link for this webinar. It is free and open to the public. It will also be recorded for future viewing.


References

  1. Fjelstad AB, Hommelstad J, Sorteberg A. Infections related to intrathecal baclofen therapy in children and adults: frequency and risk factors. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2009 Nov;4(5):487-93. doi: 10.3171/2009.6.PEDS0921. PMID: 19877786.
  2. Tyack L, Copeland L, McCartney L, Waugh MC. Adverse events associated with paediatric intrathecal baclofen in Australia: 5 years of data collection. J Paediatr Child Health. 2021 Feb;57(2):258-262. doi: 10.1111/jpc.15194. Epub 2020 Sep 25. PMID: 32975337.
  3. Imerci A, Rogers KJ, Pargas C, Sees JP, Miller F. Identification of complications in paediatric cerebral palsy treated with intrathecal baclofen pump: a descriptive analysis of 15 years at one institution. J Child Orthop. 2019 Oct 1;13(5):529-535. doi: 10.1302/1863-2548.13.190112. PMID: 31695821; PMCID: PMC6808077.
  4. Desai VR, Raskin JS, Mohan A, Montojo J, Briceño V, Curry DJ, Lam S. A standardized protocol to reduce pediatric baclofen pump infections: a quality improvement initiative. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2018 Apr;21(4):395-400. doi: 10.3171/2017.10.PEDS17248. Epub 2018 Jan 26. PMID: 29372853.
  5. Desai VR, Raskin JS, Mohan A, Montojo J, Briceño V, Curry DJ, Lam S. A standardized protocol to reduce pediatric baclofen pump infections: a quality improvement initiative. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2018 Apr;21(4):395-400. doi: 10.3171/2017.10.PEDS17248. Epub 2018 Jan 26. PMID: 29372853.
  6. Spader HS, Bollo RJ, Bowers CA, Riva-Cambrin J. Risk factors for baclofen pump infection in children: a multivariate analysis. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2016 Jun;17(6):756-62. doi: 10.3171/2015.11.PEDS15421. Epub 2016 Feb 26. PMID: 26919315.
  7. Haranhalli N, Anand D, Wisoff JH, Harter DH, Weiner HL, Blate M, Roth J. Intrathecal baclofen therapy: complication avoidance and management. Childs Nerv Syst. 2011 Mar;27(3):421-7. doi: 10.1007/s00381-010-1277-9. Epub 2010 Sep 18. PMID: 20853002.
  8. Motta F, Antonello CE. Analysis of complications in 430 consecutive pediatric patients treated with intrathecal baclofen therapy: 14-year experience. J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2014 Mar;13(3):301-6. doi: 10.3171/2013.11.PEDS13253. Epub 2014 Jan 3. Erratum in: J Neurosurg Pediatr. 2014 May;13(5):588. PMID: 24404968.
  9. Borowski A, Littleton AG, Borkhuu B, Presedo A, Shah S, Dabney KW, Lyons S, McMannus M, Miller F. Complications of intrathecal baclofen pump therapy in pediatric patients. J Pediatr Orthop. 2010 Jan-Feb;30(1):76-81. doi: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e3181c6b257. PMID: 20032747.
  10. Gooch JL, Oberg WA, Grams B, Ward LA, Walker ML. Complications of intrathecal baclofen pumps in children. Pediatr Neurosurg. 2003 Jul;39(1):1-6. doi: 10.1159/000070870. PMID: 12784068.
A headshot of Lily Collison with short, dark hair, the cover of Pure Grit and blond haired Kara Buckley

Pure Grit: An interview with the authors

Ila Eckhoff with tight curly brown hair smiles broadly with dark glasses and a light blue fleece over her v-neck shirt.

Ila Eckhoff, is a managing director at Blackrock Associates and is featured in Pure Grit.

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network will kick off its 2022 MyCP webinar series with an interview of the authors of Pure Grit, a book full of stories about remarkable people with physical disabilities doing extraordinary things.  The webinar is free and open to the public next Tuesday, January 11 at 8 pm ET. Ila Eckhoff, an accomplished financial services sector leader and one of the featured people in the book, will also join the conversation with authors Lily Collison and Kara Buckley.

The interview will include how the authors sought to develop the book, chose their subjects, and what they hoped the book would achieve. The one hour webinar will include 40 minutes of interview followed by open Q&A with the attendees.

Please join us for the interview.  If you are not already registered for the MyCP Webinar Series, you can sign up here.  A free Zoom account is required to sign into the webinar.  We look forward to seeing you there.  If you cannot make it, the interview will be recorded and posted on our YouTube channel within 24 hours.

Happy New Year 2022 from the CP Research Network with a black background and fireworks in the corners

Happy New Year from the CP Research Network

At the Cerebral Palsy Research Network, we have a lot to be thankful for.  You, our great extended cerebral palsy (CP) community, helped us achieve our fundraising goal of $10,000 this past month for our MyCP webinar series in 2022.  With our board of directors’ matching, we raised more than $30,000 for our network! We are excited to bring our MyCP webinar series back in full swing next week beginning with a live interview of the authors of Pure Grit (details to come out tomorrow).  Thank you to all who contributed and helped to spread the word!

2021 in Review

Last year was transformative in numerous ways for the CP Research Network.  We kicked off the year with the announcement of our merger with CP NOW. The combination of their educational and wellness programming with our efforts led to significant accomplishments including:

 

Our Research and Quality Improvement initiatives made significant progress in both seeking to answer key research questions about CP and improving the treatment of people with CP now.  A few highlights include:

What’s new for 2022?

We have a lot of projects that will culminate in 2022! These include multiple publications of our work in leading journals, partnerships to sustain and grow our wellbeing offerings, continued progress on our research and quality initiatives, and the return of our MyCP webinar series to name a few.

There are lots of ways to stay engaged with us.

Please consider one of these:

All the best to you and the entire CP community for 2022!

 

 

 

 

Cerebral Palsy Fitness program gets sponsorship from Neurocrine Biosciences

Neurocrine Biosciences Sponsors Cerebral Palsy Fitness

Neurocrine Biosciences logo

Neurocrine Biosciences is the exclusive sponsor of our MyCP Fitness program with Staying Driven.

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network announced that Neurocrine Biosciences, a pharmaceutical manufacturer based in Southern California, will be sponsoring the network’s MyCP Fitness Program hosted by Staying Driven. The CP Research Network launched its MyCP Fitness program in June 2021 to enable members of the MyCP community to have access to quality adaptive fitness from the safety and comfort of their own home. The network chose adaptive fitness coach Steph “the Hammer” Roach and her crew of adaptive fitness trainers to provide these free services to our community. The Neurocrine sponsorship enables us to continue the program through 2022.

While physical activity is important for everyone’s health, it has been shown to be even more important for people with disabilities like CP who are at greater risk for cardiometabolic disease.[ref] The challenge is that most gyms or virtual fitness programs don’t have appropriate accommodations or adaptations for people with CP. Staying Driven, founded by Steph Roach, a former CrossFit trainer who has CP, focuses on fitness for people with disabilities. Our program was an attractive fit for Neurocrine which has a philosophy is to holistically support and be good partners to the patient community they hope to serve.

The Neurocrine Biosciences sponsorship not only extends the length of the program, but enables the CP Research Network to reach more community members. Teens and adults with CP who are interested in participating in the MyCP Fitness program can sign up for free on our Cerebral Palsy Fitness page.
The MyCP webinar on assessing pain in adults with CP will be delivered by Drs Gannotti and Noritz

Assessing Pain for Adults with Cerebral Palsy

Drs. Gannotti and Noritz, dressed in business attire, at an informal meeting in Austin, TX

Drs Gannotti and Noritz, clinicians who treat both children and adults, will present on assessing pain in adults with cerebral palsy (CP).

This month’s MyCP webinar will focus on the CP Research Network’s Adult Care quality improvement (QI) initiative at 8 pm ET on Monday, October 25. CP Research Network leaders Garey Noritz, MD and Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD, will provide an overview of this initiative which is focused on pain for adults with CP. Quality improvement, like clinical research, is aimed at improving health outcomes but using a different methodology to achieve those outcomes. QI is exciting because it can change health outcomes much more rapidly than clinical research. The webinar will include a brief overview of how QI enables these faster changes in outcomes.

Our Adult Care QI initiative includes clinicians that treat adults with CP and community advocates working together with a global aim of improving the care that adults with CP receive. Supported by data from our Adult Wellbeing and Chronic Pain study, this initiative has narrowed it first efforts to uniformly assess pain in each clinic visit for adults with CP. In addition to support from our ongoing study, a recent MyCP focus group with several adults with CP helped shape initial assessments of pain used by the participating clinicians.

Dr. Gannotti is a professor of physical therapy at the University of Hartford and a PT affiliated with Shriners’ Hospital of Springfield and co-leads the adult study group of the CP Research Network. Dr. Noritz is the Director of the Complex Care program at Nationwide Children’s Hospital and an adult internist who treats adults with CP. Doctors Gannotti and Noritz will present for approximately 25 minutes before opening the webinar to questions and answers. Community members who wish to participate in the webinar can sign up on CPRN or to receive an email with a link to the recording after the webinar.

A grey page banner with a photo of Heather Hancock, a smiling woman with long brown hair wearing a red sweater and glasses.

CP Stories: Heather Hancock Defies the Odds

How Heather Went from Survival to Pioneer for Change

From the moment she was born prematurely, CPRN advocate Heather Hancock was battling to survive. Today she reveals how she is still fighting for adequate care for adults with cerebral palsy.
Heather Hancock, pictured with long brown hair and red shirt, wire rimmed glasses with a book case behind her is an editor

Heather Hancock is a writer and an editor as well as an advocate for cerebral research and care for adults.

When Heather Hancock was born more than three months prematurely – at 25 weeks gestation – doctors warned she would struggle to survive the first 24 hours of life.

But Heather defied the odds. After three months in an incubator, the tiny baby was well enough to be taken home. That was the first day her mother, Edna, was allowed to pick up her baby and hug her.

As a toddler growing up in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Heather was slow to crawl and meet her physical development milestones. Meanwhile, her younger brother, Colin, born 13 months after her, was advancing rapidly.

Her family faced a fight to enroll her at the local school.

“Back then, disabled children were shunted away to special schools out of the public eye,” she says. “I was integrated into the public school system, which was great for my education but not good for my social life. Kids did not accept me very well, and neither did their parents, so I endured incessant bullying from kindergarten through to grade 12.”

The bullying took its toll on Heather. By the age of 14, she was having suicidal thoughts but fought through them, crediting her faith for continually bringing her comfort and purpose during dark times.

As an adult, Heather was keen to pursue a career as a registered nurse but faced more hurdles. Halfway through her training program, she began to experience pain in her knees. Being on her feet for hours on end and the job’s physical nature was too much for her. Mustering her characteristic grit, Heather went back to college to get an office administration certificate. She was determined to work in healthcare and took up a position as a unit clerk in an outpatient clinic.

However, after a 22-year career, Heather began to experience painful lower back spasms. The pain made it impossible for her to walk for several hours each day, and she took medical retirement at 44.

“It seemed like nobody could tell me what was going on,” she recalls of that time. “In Canada, there is no doctor that specializes in adults with cerebral palsy. It feels like you are just cut loose when you are 18 and told to “have a good life!”

Although she underwent rehabilitation and saw physiatrists who work with spasticity and stroke patients, she noticed a stark difference from the care she’d received as a child.

“It can get harder to find a team of doctors as you get older,” she explains. “Today children with cerebral palsy are sometimes treated by a multidisciplinary healthcare team. It would be great if adults had the same access to help, equipment, and physical therapy. Finding the right team of doctors is crucial so that everyone can put their heads together and come up with a plan.”

Professionally, Heather pivoted to other talents. She forged a new career as a professional coach providing inner healing for women suffering from trauma and abuse. Then, in March 2019, Heather began working as a contributing writer penning fiction and poetry for CoffeeHouseWriters.com. She became an editor in June 2020. Working to her own schedule helps manage her pain.

“When you are your own boss you can schedule things for times that work better for you,” says Heather, who now writes from home in Maple Creek, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Meanwhile, Heather continues to advocate for the Cerebral Palsy community. She relentlessly contributes to research and discussions on the CP Research Network’s MyCP community forum to ensure that the “absence of knowledge and care for the adult CP community” is addressed. She is also pushing for change with her local cerebral palsy association in Saskatchewan and national and international groups.

“I’ve been a pioneer since I was old enough to walk,” she smiles. “I may not see the benefit in my lifetime, but the younger generations will.”

Thank you Heather for sharing your inspiring story!

Marquis Lane, a smiling young man seated on a walker, wearing a Georgia sweatshirt with four friends behind him at a stadium.

CP Stories: Marquise Lane

Marquise Lane, with a beaming smile and glasses sits listening to music in his college dorm with a navy football sweatshirt

Marquise is always smiling ear to ear — here while listening to music in his dorm room.

It’s a daily decision to keep fighting and believing in yourself.
Marquise Lane
Client Success Specialist

For Marquise Lane, succeeding at college wasn’t just a matter of working hard and pushing himself academically. Conquering his CP mobility hurdles and achieving independence were also vital.

When Marquise Lane graduated from UGA in 2016 with a BA in Management Information Systems (MIS) the moment was extra special to him.

As a young person with cerebral palsy, Marquise hadn’t just put in the hours of study needed to gain his degree, he’d also worked tirelessly to overcome the physical hurdles holding him back from his college dreams.

In high school, Marquise got up very early to make sure he dressed himself – here in khakis and a grey argyle sweater.

Marquise was determined to be independent from an early age so he made sure he got up early to have time to dress himself.

“I always wanted to go to college,” says Marquise, 27, who lives in Valdosta, GA. “But it wasn’t the mental things like the schoolwork that were in the way, it was more of the physical things like dressing and putting shoes on.”

Armed with a positive mental attitude, Marquise took on the challenge with gusto. Throughout his 12th grade, he got up extra early in order to practice mastering the independent skills he needed to succeed.

“I had to leave the house at 7 am so I’d get up at 5.30 am to give myself that extra time to dress and put my shoes on by myself – just to practice,” he recalls. “For a while I needed help but I got to the point where I was independent enough. Eventually, my mom agreed I was ready to go to college.”

Marquise was diagnosed with Spastic Diplegia cerebral palsy at the age of three and says he grew up fully understanding what having CP meant.

A young Marquise, in a white t-shirt, demonstrates his domestic skills by ironing a pair of his dark slacks

A young Marquise Lane takes up ironing his own slacks to help out around the house.

As a young boy, Marquise wanted to do the same activities as other kids his age but also knew his circumstances were different

At seven years old, Marquise wanted to do all the activities his peers did including baseball!

“My mom’s always been big on talking to me like an adult so from three I knew what I had,” he says. “I don’t really like the word “different” because I do feel like I’m a normal person, I just have a different set of circumstances I have to deal with. As a younger kid I looked at other kids and saw them do things like swing on the monkey bars and then play football and sport. I wanted to do that too, but it was hard because I couldn’t. You have to fight that feeling of “I’m not good enough” or “I’m weird.” Every day you have to wake up and focus on the small victories and the positive things you’ve done. That provides momentum to keep going forward.”

At UGA, Marquise lived alone on campus in an accessible room and says he is grateful for the friends he made who would always lend a helping hand with things like Walmart and barbershop runs. His challenges on campus ranged from navigating the hills in Athens, GA, to working out how to get from A to B. From the start, the college paired him with a disability coordinator tasked with ensuring all his classes were accessible and that he had all the help and resources he needed.

“UGA went out of its way to make sure I could get to where I needed to be,” he says. “I had all the tools I needed to succeed academically and UGA provided a van service that took me from class to class and just about anywhere else on campus I needed to go.

Marquise Lane sits down on his aluminum walker smiling with a wrought iron arch and a building with white pillars behind him

Marquise Lane sits on his walker smiling while on his college campus

“There were several occasions where an entire 300-person class was moved because the original building wasn’t accessible for me and I had letters to share with professors so they were aware of any special assistance I needed.”

Regardless, it took stamina and endurance for Marquise to keep pushing toward his academic goals.

“It was tough at times,” he says. “When you look around you see that most people don’t have to work as hard as you do to accomplish basic tasks. They don’t have to worry about accessibility and how far away things are. I learned to focus on myself and limit comparisons.”

Marquise Lane, in a red sweatshirt at a job fair, sits holding a large white sign with the words “Hire Me” in red

Marquise was not shy in pursuing work out of college.

He cites graduating from college as the culmination of belief in himself and hard work. “It showed me and my family that I could do anything I put my mind to,” he says.

Since graduating in May 2016, Marquise has worked as a client success specialist for ProcessPlan. His goal now is to continue living independently and advance his career.

“There isn’t some magical point where you have things figured out and that’s it,” he says. “Having a vision for the things you want to accomplish in life helps. Once you have a vision, you can break that down into actionable steps and go forward. It’s a daily decision to keep fighting and believing in yourself.”

“Traveling With a Wheelchair” on a bright green page banner with a photo of a wheelchair beside the ramp to enter the aircraft.

Traveling With a Wheelchair

A damning report has revealed how the country’s leading airlines have lost or damaged at least 15,425 wheelchairs or scooters since the end of 2018. As we travel from A to B, what steps can we take to safeguard the precious cargo our community relies on?

Traveling by air can be stressful for anyone but handing over a wheelchair to busy airline staff and hoping to find it unscathed and fully-functioning at your destination can feel like a lottery. Sadly, for many traveling with disabilities, vacations and other trips too often go hand-in-hand with the frustrating fallout of damaged equipment.

“As a family with a wheelchair user it is a continual frustration that airlines often take such little care,” says CPRN’s Michele Shusterman. “It seems like airlines would rather pay thousands of dollars to repair or replace broken equipment instead of figuring out a process for not destroying them. Some of the experiences our community members go through are awful.”

As we await much needed change and a commitment to better care from airlines, there are some preemptive measures we can take to lower the risks of equipment being damaged in transit. Here’s our guide to traveling with a wheelchair:

Before you go, carry out maintenance.

Making sure your equipment is in the best shape possible before leaving will help it to be more durable and robust on your travels.

MANUAL WHEELCHAIRS: The newer designs of manual wheelchairs have solid inner tubes to combat against flats. Before you leave, check the tires for any inflation issues, cuts, or wear on the tread (Miller, 2017). Be sure to check the wheel locks, ensuring that they engage and disengage easily without getting caught. Go through and tighten bolts and nuts on any moving parts. This is to avoid any parts being lost during transit.

BATTERY-POWERED WHEELCHAIRS: Run through the same checks for the tires prior to your trip and consider book a service for your equipment. Battery-powered wheelchairs routinely need to be checked by an authorized dealer once or twice a year (Miller, 2017). An expert can check your battery voltage and flag up if it needs to be replaced soon.

Get familiar with the airline codes.

Airlines have a series of codes for people traveling with equipment or disability. These codes are called Special Service Request Codes, or SSR, and are given to you when you get your ticket (wheelchairtravel, 2020). They are used to keep track of special assistance requests and to assign appropriate staff to the person in need.

A few of these codes include:

CODE DESCRIPTION
WCHR Wheelchair assistance required
WCOB On-board wheelchair requested
WCMP Traveling with manual wheelchair
WCBD Traveling with dry cell battery-powered wheelchair. (WCBW for wet cell battery)

You’ll find a more comprehensive list here. Ensure that your flight ticket is marked with the correct one.

Attach instructions to your equipment.
Traveling with a wheelchair tips: A spare manual wheelchair is pictured on the tarmac with a bright pink instructional signTraveling with a wheelchair tips: A wheelchair should include handling instructions and fight details attached to the chair
It seems like a no-brainer that wheelchairs and other expensive and precious equipment should be handled with the utmost care but that can be far from the reality. Sadly, your equipment will likely encounter people who are unfamiliar with how it works and don’t have the time or inclination to find out how to operate it correctly. Attaching laminated instructions and bright reminder signs to your equipment can help to prevent rough mishandling.

Consider taking a spare if you have one.

Sometimes it is better to plan for the worst outcome so that mobility isn’t impaired during the trip. Take a spare wheelchair, often a manual one, if you can do so. This will ensure an easy back up if the airline does damage the wheelchair before you get to your destination. Having a spare wheelchair can also help when accessing certain areas where a power wheelchair may have some difficulties. If you do not have a spare, be mindful of the resources available to you in the area you are traveling. See if renting a wheelchair is an option.

Preparation for flight at the airport
Traveling with a wheelchair tips: A manual chair is bound with cellophane and loose items removed in prep for travel.
If you are using a manual collapsible wheelchair, ask if the aircraft has a closet large enough to accommodate it. This ensures you can take your equipment all the way to the gate. If your equipment is being stored in the cargo hold with baggage, carefully remove anything that you think may come lose during handling. Ask for reassurance that it will be handled with care.

Ask for assistance if you need it – it’s your right.

Airlines must provide assistance and offer preboarding to passengers with disabilities who make their needs known prior to travel or at the gate. Get familiar with the Air Carrier Access Act of 1986 (ACAA), a law that guarantees people with disabilities the right to receive fair and nondiscriminatory treatment when traveling on flights operated by airlines in the U.S (wheelchairtravel, 2020).

If an airline damages your equipment, it may be covered.
Plane travel with a wheelchair is challenging: a wheelchair, collapsed on its side, rides up a luggage ramp into an airplane
Airlines are mainly responsible for damaging equipment during their flights. This can be up to the entire cost of the original listing price of the wheelchair. For this process to happen properly, report damages IMMEDIATELY after your flight. This further ensures that it is documented and brought to the right people, a step in the direction of making the airline 100% responsible for damages!

Sources:

Flying With A Wheelchair: Guide To Air Travel For People With Disabilities. Wheelchair Travel. (2020, January 30).

Miller, F., & Bachrach, S. J. (2017). Cerebral palsy: a complete guide for caregiving (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press.