The footer from the CP Research Network website on a dark green background, with a pink button indicating ‘Edit Notifications’.

Personalize Your Cerebral Palsy News

We have added a simple way for you to personalize your cerebral palsy news from cprn.org. We post information – educational information, research news, CP daily living experiences and community “CP stories” several times a month on our website.

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The My Notifications page allows you fine grained control over the emails you receive from the CP Research Network.

There are three ways to get these updates from cprn.org:

  1. Any time you may visit our blog at https://cprn.org/blog
  2. Subscribe to our alerts and receive an immediate email for every new post
  3. Join the MyCP community platform and customize your updates from us. MyCP also gives you the opportunity to contribute to research, engage with peers, clinicians and researchers on our forum, and receive customized reports and resources based on your experiences with CP.

By joining MyCP you can customize your CP Research Network emails by choosing the categories or authors of most interest to you. Do you want to read about our latest advances in CP research – just check the CPRN Studies category! Want to learn how we can keep you healthy – just select “Wellbeing.” Interested in practical tips from experiences living with cerebral palsy – “CP Daily Living” is the topic for you; just want info about adults with CP – choose “adults”.

Join MyCP to personalize your content from the CP Research Network today! Or if you are already a member, go personalize your content.

A grey page banner with a photo of Heather Hancock, a smiling woman with long brown hair wearing a red sweater and glasses.

CP Stories: Heather Hancock Defies the Odds

How Heather Went from Survival to Pioneer for Change

From the moment she was born prematurely, CPRN advocate Heather Hancock was battling to survive. Today she reveals how she is still fighting for adequate care for adults with cerebral palsy.
Heather Hancock, pictured with long brown hair and red shirt, wire rimmed glasses with a book case behind her is an editor

Heather Hancock is a writer and an editor as well as an advocate for cerebral research and care for adults.

When Heather Hancock was born more than three months prematurely – at 25 weeks gestation – doctors warned she would struggle to survive the first 24 hours of life.

But Heather defied the odds. After three months in an incubator, the tiny baby was well enough to be taken home. That was the first day her mother, Edna, was allowed to pick up her baby and hug her.

As a toddler growing up in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, Heather was slow to crawl and meet her physical development milestones. Meanwhile, her younger brother, Colin, born 13 months after her, was advancing rapidly.

Her family faced a fight to enroll her at the local school.

“Back then, disabled children were shunted away to special schools out of the public eye,” she says. “I was integrated into the public school system, which was great for my education but not good for my social life. Kids did not accept me very well, and neither did their parents, so I endured incessant bullying from kindergarten through to grade 12.”

The bullying took its toll on Heather. By the age of 14, she was having suicidal thoughts but fought through them, crediting her faith for continually bringing her comfort and purpose during dark times.

As an adult, Heather was keen to pursue a career as a registered nurse but faced more hurdles. Halfway through her training program, she began to experience pain in her knees. Being on her feet for hours on end and the job’s physical nature was too much for her. Mustering her characteristic grit, Heather went back to college to get an office administration certificate. She was determined to work in healthcare and took up a position as a unit clerk in an outpatient clinic.

However, after a 22-year career, Heather began to experience painful lower back spasms. The pain made it impossible for her to walk for several hours each day, and she took medical retirement at 44.

“It seemed like nobody could tell me what was going on,” she recalls of that time. “In Canada, there is no doctor that specializes in adults with cerebral palsy. It feels like you are just cut loose when you are 18 and told to “have a good life!”

Although she underwent rehabilitation and saw physiatrists who work with spasticity and stroke patients, she noticed a stark difference from the care she’d received as a child.

“It can get harder to find a team of doctors as you get older,” she explains. “Today children with cerebral palsy are sometimes treated by a multidisciplinary healthcare team. It would be great if adults had the same access to help, equipment, and physical therapy. Finding the right team of doctors is crucial so that everyone can put their heads together and come up with a plan.”

Professionally, Heather pivoted to other talents. She forged a new career as a professional coach providing inner healing for women suffering from trauma and abuse. Then, in March 2019, Heather began working as a contributing writer penning fiction and poetry for CoffeeHouseWriters.com. She became an editor in June 2020. Working to her own schedule helps manage her pain.

“When you are your own boss you can schedule things for times that work better for you,” says Heather, who now writes from home in Maple Creek, Saskatchewan, Canada.

Meanwhile, Heather continues to advocate for the Cerebral Palsy community. She relentlessly contributes to research and discussions on the CP Research Network’s MyCP community forum to ensure that the “absence of knowledge and care for the adult CP community” is addressed. She is also pushing for change with her local cerebral palsy association in Saskatchewan and national and international groups.

“I’ve been a pioneer since I was old enough to walk,” she smiles. “I may not see the benefit in my lifetime, but the younger generations will.”

Thank you Heather for sharing your inspiring story!

Marquis Lane, a smiling young man seated on a walker, wearing a Georgia sweatshirt with four friends behind him at a stadium.

CP Stories: Marquise Lane

Marquise Lane, with a beaming smile and glasses sits listening to music in his college dorm with a navy football sweatshirt

Marquise is always smiling ear to ear — here while listening to music in his dorm room.

It’s a daily decision to keep fighting and believing in yourself.
Marquise Lane
Client Success Specialist

For Marquise Lane, succeeding at college wasn’t just a matter of working hard and pushing himself academically. Conquering his CP mobility hurdles and achieving independence were also vital.

When Marquise Lane graduated from UGA in 2016 with a BA in Management Information Systems (MIS) the moment was extra special to him.

As a young person with cerebral palsy, Marquise hadn’t just put in the hours of study needed to gain his degree, he’d also worked tirelessly to overcome the physical hurdles holding him back from his college dreams.

In high school, Marquise got up very early to make sure he dressed himself – here in khakis and a grey argyle sweater.

Marquise was determined to be independent from an early age so he made sure he got up early to have time to dress himself.

“I always wanted to go to college,” says Marquise, 27, who lives in Valdosta, GA. “But it wasn’t the mental things like the schoolwork that were in the way, it was more of the physical things like dressing and putting shoes on.”

Armed with a positive mental attitude, Marquise took on the challenge with gusto. Throughout his 12th grade, he got up extra early in order to practice mastering the independent skills he needed to succeed.

“I had to leave the house at 7 am so I’d get up at 5.30 am to give myself that extra time to dress and put my shoes on by myself – just to practice,” he recalls. “For a while I needed help but I got to the point where I was independent enough. Eventually, my mom agreed I was ready to go to college.”

Marquise was diagnosed with Spastic Diplegia cerebral palsy at the age of three and says he grew up fully understanding what having CP meant.

A young Marquise, in a white t-shirt, demonstrates his domestic skills by ironing a pair of his dark slacks

A young Marquise Lane takes up ironing his own slacks to help out around the house.

As a young boy, Marquise wanted to do the same activities as other kids his age but also knew his circumstances were different

At seven years old, Marquise wanted to do all the activities his peers did including baseball!

“My mom’s always been big on talking to me like an adult so from three I knew what I had,” he says. “I don’t really like the word “different” because I do feel like I’m a normal person, I just have a different set of circumstances I have to deal with. As a younger kid I looked at other kids and saw them do things like swing on the monkey bars and then play football and sport. I wanted to do that too, but it was hard because I couldn’t. You have to fight that feeling of “I’m not good enough” or “I’m weird.” Every day you have to wake up and focus on the small victories and the positive things you’ve done. That provides momentum to keep going forward.”

At UGA, Marquise lived alone on campus in an accessible room and says he is grateful for the friends he made who would always lend a helping hand with things like Walmart and barbershop runs. His challenges on campus ranged from navigating the hills in Athens, GA, to working out how to get from A to B. From the start, the college paired him with a disability coordinator tasked with ensuring all his classes were accessible and that he had all the help and resources he needed.

“UGA went out of its way to make sure I could get to where I needed to be,” he says. “I had all the tools I needed to succeed academically and UGA provided a van service that took me from class to class and just about anywhere else on campus I needed to go.

Marquise Lane sits down on his aluminum walker smiling with a wrought iron arch and a building with white pillars behind him

Marquise Lane sits on his walker smiling while on his college campus

“There were several occasions where an entire 300-person class was moved because the original building wasn’t accessible for me and I had letters to share with professors so they were aware of any special assistance I needed.”

Regardless, it took stamina and endurance for Marquise to keep pushing toward his academic goals.

“It was tough at times,” he says. “When you look around you see that most people don’t have to work as hard as you do to accomplish basic tasks. They don’t have to worry about accessibility and how far away things are. I learned to focus on myself and limit comparisons.”

Marquise Lane, in a red sweatshirt at a job fair, sits holding a large white sign with the words “Hire Me” in red

Marquise was not shy in pursuing work out of college.

He cites graduating from college as the culmination of belief in himself and hard work. “It showed me and my family that I could do anything I put my mind to,” he says.

Since graduating in May 2016, Marquise has worked as a client success specialist for ProcessPlan. His goal now is to continue living independently and advance his career.

“There isn’t some magical point where you have things figured out and that’s it,” he says. “Having a vision for the things you want to accomplish in life helps. Once you have a vision, you can break that down into actionable steps and go forward. It’s a daily decision to keep fighting and believing in yourself.”

Small preview image of Dr. Laura Gilbert linking to blog post

Dystonia Agenda Takes Center Stage at Child Neurology Society Meeting

Laura Gilbert, DO, a pediatric neurologist, with shoulder length brown hair and a dark green shirt, smiles broadly.

Laura Gilbert, DO, has won a Junior Member Award from the Child Neurology Society, for her abstract on a patient-centered dystonia research agenda.

Dr. Laura Gilbert, a pediatric neurologist at St. Louis Children’s Hospital, has been selected to present our Dystonia in Cerebral Palsy patient-centered research agenda at the Child Neurology Society (CNS) meeting in Boston, MA in September 2021.

Her talk, entitled, “Top 10 Areas of Research Need for People with Cerebral Palsy and Dystonia: A Novel Community-driven Agenda,” is based on collaborative work she carried out with the Network to engage the community in a research priority setting process for dystonia in CP in 2020.

“Dr. Gilbert played a significant role in the organization and analysis of our dystonia agenda setting process,” said Bhooma Aravamuthan, MD, DPhil, a pediatric movement disorders specialist from Washington University in St. Louis. “She is a smart and savvy burgeoning clinician researcher. It’s been a gift to see her interest bloom in dystonia in CP.”

The Child Neurology Society gathers neurologists annually to advance research and the treatment of pediatric neurological conditions. The live platform presentation has been selected as one of the top 20 abstracts submitted to the meeting. Further congratulations are in order for Dr. Gilbert who will be recognized as one of four Outstanding Junior Members for her work.

Her talk, and talks by her mentor Dr. Aravamuthan, will increase the focus on CP at this year’s CNS meeting. This increased focus will improve child neurologist awareness of issues faced by people with CP and promote research opportunities in the field.

“Traveling With a Wheelchair” on a bright green page banner with a photo of a wheelchair beside the ramp to enter the aircraft.

Traveling With a Wheelchair

A damning report has revealed how the country’s leading airlines have lost or damaged at least 15,425 wheelchairs or scooters since the end of 2018. As we travel from A to B, what steps can we take to safeguard the precious cargo our community relies on?

Traveling by air can be stressful for anyone but handing over a wheelchair to busy airline staff and hoping to find it unscathed and fully-functioning at your destination can feel like a lottery. Sadly, for many traveling with disabilities, vacations and other trips too often go hand-in-hand with the frustrating fallout of damaged equipment.

“As a family with a wheelchair user it is a continual frustration that airlines often take such little care,” says CPRN’s Michele Shusterman. “It seems like airlines would rather pay thousands of dollars to repair or replace broken equipment instead of figuring out a process for not destroying them. Some of the experiences our community members go through are awful.”

As we await much needed change and a commitment to better care from airlines, there are some preemptive measures we can take to lower the risks of equipment being damaged in transit. Here’s our guide to traveling with a wheelchair:

Before you go, carry out maintenance.

Making sure your equipment is in the best shape possible before leaving will help it to be more durable and robust on your travels.

MANUAL WHEELCHAIRS: The newer designs of manual wheelchairs have solid inner tubes to combat against flats. Before you leave, check the tires for any inflation issues, cuts, or wear on the tread (Miller, 2017). Be sure to check the wheel locks, ensuring that they engage and disengage easily without getting caught. Go through and tighten bolts and nuts on any moving parts. This is to avoid any parts being lost during transit.

BATTERY-POWERED WHEELCHAIRS: Run through the same checks for the tires prior to your trip and consider book a service for your equipment. Battery-powered wheelchairs routinely need to be checked by an authorized dealer once or twice a year (Miller, 2017). An expert can check your battery voltage and flag up if it needs to be replaced soon.

Get familiar with the airline codes.

Airlines have a series of codes for people traveling with equipment or disability. These codes are called Special Service Request Codes, or SSR, and are given to you when you get your ticket (wheelchairtravel, 2020). They are used to keep track of special assistance requests and to assign appropriate staff to the person in need.

A few of these codes include:

CODE DESCRIPTION
WCHR Wheelchair assistance required
WCOB On-board wheelchair requested
WCMP Traveling with manual wheelchair
WCBD Traveling with dry cell battery-powered wheelchair. (WCBW for wet cell battery)

You’ll find a more comprehensive list here. Ensure that your flight ticket is marked with the correct one.

Attach instructions to your equipment.
Traveling with a wheelchair tips: A spare manual wheelchair is pictured on the tarmac with a bright pink instructional signTraveling with a wheelchair tips: A wheelchair should include handling instructions and fight details attached to the chair
It seems like a no-brainer that wheelchairs and other expensive and precious equipment should be handled with the utmost care but that can be far from the reality. Sadly, your equipment will likely encounter people who are unfamiliar with how it works and don’t have the time or inclination to find out how to operate it correctly. Attaching laminated instructions and bright reminder signs to your equipment can help to prevent rough mishandling.

Consider taking a spare if you have one.

Sometimes it is better to plan for the worst outcome so that mobility isn’t impaired during the trip. Take a spare wheelchair, often a manual one, if you can do so. This will ensure an easy back up if the airline does damage the wheelchair before you get to your destination. Having a spare wheelchair can also help when accessing certain areas where a power wheelchair may have some difficulties. If you do not have a spare, be mindful of the resources available to you in the area you are traveling. See if renting a wheelchair is an option.

Preparation for flight at the airport
Traveling with a wheelchair tips: A manual chair is bound with cellophane and loose items removed in prep for travel.
If you are using a manual collapsible wheelchair, ask if the aircraft has a closet large enough to accommodate it. This ensures you can take your equipment all the way to the gate. If your equipment is being stored in the cargo hold with baggage, carefully remove anything that you think may come lose during handling. Ask for reassurance that it will be handled with care.

Ask for assistance if you need it – it’s your right.

Airlines must provide assistance and offer preboarding to passengers with disabilities who make their needs known prior to travel or at the gate. Get familiar with the Air Carrier Access Act of 1986 (ACAA), a law that guarantees people with disabilities the right to receive fair and nondiscriminatory treatment when traveling on flights operated by airlines in the U.S (wheelchairtravel, 2020).

If an airline damages your equipment, it may be covered.
Plane travel with a wheelchair is challenging: a wheelchair, collapsed on its side, rides up a luggage ramp into an airplane
Airlines are mainly responsible for damaging equipment during their flights. This can be up to the entire cost of the original listing price of the wheelchair. For this process to happen properly, report damages IMMEDIATELY after your flight. This further ensures that it is documented and brought to the right people, a step in the direction of making the airline 100% responsible for damages!

Sources:

Flying With A Wheelchair: Guide To Air Travel For People With Disabilities. Wheelchair Travel. (2020, January 30).

Miller, F., & Bachrach, S. J. (2017). Cerebral palsy: a complete guide for caregiving (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press.

A grey banner with ‘MyCP Webinar Series’ and a photo of Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD; smiling and wearing a brown blazer.

Join our Webinar on Adult Wellbeing and Pain in Cerebral Palsy

How does your lived experience align with the initial results from our chronic pain study?

Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD, smiles with brown shoulder length hair, a red blouse and a brown blazer.

Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD

Compiling information about the chronic pain and wellbeing challenges many adults with cerebral palsy experience, sometimes on a daily basis, is an important priority for the Cerebral Palsy Research Network as we work to improve health outcomes for our community.

On Monday, July 19, at 8 pm ET, Mary Gannotti, PT, PhD, co-principal investigator of the CP Research Network’s adult study group, will present an update on our adult study of wellbeing and chronic pain.

Dr. Gannotti’s study seeks to gather cross-sectional data from 500 adults with CP to demonstrate health differences between adults with CP and the adult population overall. This interim report includes data from approximately the first 200 participants in the study.

“Members of the community will find it valuable to see how their personal lived experience aligns with many other adults with CP,” says Paul Gross, President, CEO and Co-Founder of the CP Research Network. “Dr. Gannotti will discuss how we plan to use these findings to support additional adult research and to advocate for policy changes in healthcare to improve health outcomes for adults with CP.”

Prior to Tuesday’s virtual event, MyCP webinar series registrants and MyCP members will receive a reminder with a link to the webinar. If you are not subscribed to the series, you can sign up for this individual webinar on our MyCP Webinar Series page.

The presentation will last for approximately 30 minutes and be followed by an open Q&A with Dr. Gannotti. All of our webinars are recorded and posted on our YouTube channel subsequent to the live webinar. You can also view Dr. Gannotti’s inaugural presentation after we initially launched the study in 2019.

Adults with CP can still participate in the study which is hosted in our Community Registry on MyCP.

Small preview image of a spider graph linking to blog post

CPRN’s progress as a Learning Health Network is published!

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network’s progress as a Learning Health Network (LHN) has been published in the Journal for Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine this past week.

Primary author Amy Bailes, PT, PhD, published a self-assessment from leaders in the Cerebral Palsy Research Network using a tool developed by Cincinnati Children’s Hospital called the Network Maturity Grid (NMG).[1] The NMG is used to detail the maturation of necessary infrastructure and processes to create learning networks (LNs).

Bailes’ publication, the fourth since the CP Research Network’s inception six years ago, provides a glimpse into future directions for the network’s development. It details a standardizing scoring rubric used to assess progress across six domains including:

  • Systems of Leadership
  • Governance and Management
  • Quality Improvement
  • Engagement of Stakeholders
  • Data and Analytics
  • Research

The results were tabulated and graphed to provide insights into progress in each domain and areas for improvement.

The CP Research Network’s leadership team amalgamated this analysis to identify key investments that will improve our network maturity over the next five years. Moving forward, these investments will be centered on leadership development, financial sustainability, quality improvement training, the capture of patient-reported outcomes, and enhancing the quality of data collection.

The purple cover of the Journal of Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine has its title and graphics of children playing, a person in a wheelchair, walkers and helping hands inside of green, pink and orange circles.

The cover of the Pediatric Rehabilitation Medicine.

The Network will incorporate the NMG tool into annual planning. Investments will be measured over the course of a five-year strategic plan for 2021-2025.

Members of the professional and academic community can access the article online with a Journal subscription. Community members may download the original article (prior to revisions required by the editors) from our website.

Four smiling women stand outdoors on a sunny day behind the UP Academy sign with their arms folded and resting on top.

CP Stories: Tanya Sheckley and UP Academy

Meet the CP mom who overcame her grief to build an incredible inclusive school in her daughter’s memory

Everyone needs a place to belong. Inclusivity is life.
Tanya Sheckley
Mom, Inclusive School Creator

Tanya Sheckley’s vision of creating an inclusive school empowering ALL children was almost shattered with the untimely death of her beloved daughter Eliza. Yet, the resilient mother channeled her grief into creating a school to embody everything Eliza taught her about ableism, education, and empathy.

Like many CP parents, Tanya Sheckley worked hard to research education options for her daughter Eliza, who was born with spastic quadriplegia cerebral palsy.

As her daughter’s kindergarten years approached, Tanya, who lives in Mountain View, California, was dismayed to learn that many schools provided the bare minimum when it came to educating children with disabilities.

Tanya Sheckley in a red blouse smiles at her daughter Eliza who is wearing a magenta taffeta party dress with red flowers in the neckline.

Tanya Sheckley with her daughter Eliza.

Eventually, Tanya found a parent participation school that was great for Eliza, who was unable to walk or talk due to her cerebral palsy. Her daughter’s new kindergarten teacher had experience in special education and Tanya was happy to see Eliza thrive.

“She learned to read, do math, and was curious about science,” recalls Tanya. “Kids didn’t see her as ‘different.’ She fit in, she was happy and became one of the most popular kids at school. She did well academically with accommodation for the way she learned. We had gotten lucky.”

By first grade, things were changing. Despite Eliza’s stellar kindergarten record, Tanya and her husband Chris were frustrated by the recommendation to put their bright and inquisitive daughter into a modified curriculum for children with different abilities. The one-size-fits-all model meant the work would be made easier, and Eliza would not be expected to learn the same material as her able-bodied classmates.

Under the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), public schools are required to provide access to education. Unfortunately, in a system built to educate the masses, children who are “different” often aren’t encouraged to excel in the same way as their peers.

“It felt like a barrier to providing real opportunity,” says Tanya. “Just because a student doesn’t have an effective and consistent method of expressing knowledge doesn’t mean the student doesn’t possess the knowledge. All students should be challenged in areas of strengths and supported in areas of weakness so they leave school with the knowledge and skills to be successful and independent in the world.”

Tanya, who had previously worked in business and taught as a yoga and ski instructor, became frustrated that no one school could support Eliza and her younger siblings Breda and Keller in their individual strengths. Why couldn’t there be an inclusive elementary school set up for all children to thrive?

In 2015, she decided to create an inclusive school for kids with disabilities and their able-bodied siblings.

Kids work on painting and decorating a wall at the new UP Academy.

Students decorate the wall at UP Academy.

The determined mother sought funding, secured a lease, raised awareness, and reached out to her community to recruit and admit kids who would benefit from everything the school would have to offer. The new school, UP Academy, gained 501c3 status in December 2015.

Then the unthinkable happened. Eliza passed away in her sleep in March of 2016.

“It was completely unexpected,” says Tanya. “Eliza was fine and was having fun but one Friday she came home from school early because she was tired and not feeling well. I laid her down for a nap and told her I loved her. Our nanny was there to care for all three of our children so I went to the grocery store.

“When I checked on Eliza later she wasn’t breathing and her lips were blue. We did CPR until help arrived and Eliza was transported to the hospital where they did all they could. But there was nothing more the doctors could do. Walking out and leaving her behind was one of the hardest things I’ve done in my life.”

Despite her grief, Tanya could not give up on the school.

“I needed to find a way for the grief to serve me,” she says. “My family needed me to still be a mother and wife, and Eliza had taught me about ableism, education, and empathy. I had learned too much to walk away. I could lay in bed all day or use what I have learned to help others. There were still many families of children with disabilities who couldn’t find a fit for their children in the education system. To honor Eliza and to help them, I needed to work to create change.”

For the next two years, Tanya continued to build the school and welcomed her first group of students in 2018. There were plenty of challenges. The school’s first building lease fell through but Tanya persuaded a local church to let her use their rooms for a time. Eventually another location was found and the school has had a permanent home in San Mateo for the past three years.

With 20 students enrolled in UP Academy, Tanya is considering opening another location next year in the San Francisco Bay area. It is her vision to encourage other parents and educators to launch their own schools with a course she created, the Rebel Educator Accelerator.

“When we all work together, we can be more creative and achieve more,” she says. “Our vision for UP Academy is to build a method of education that can be shared and replicated. By teaching, training and sharing our curriculum with other schools we can serve more students in new and innovative ways.”

There is not a day that passes without Tanya thinking about her daughter who continues to inspire her.

“Eliza was sweet and kind,” she says. “She loved people and spending time with her friends. She was stubborn and wanted things to be done her way. She made decisions quickly and stood by them. We still have a dish we call Eliza Guacamole, which is smashed avocado and banana.

“It’s important to remember that despite any disability, all kids want to play, learn and make friends. Everyone needs a place to belong. Inclusivity is life, it is love, it is understanding and empathy, it is the thing that allows us to learn and work and play together.”

[ends]

The diagram patient priority framework from PSCORE shows an interrelationship among different interests in cerebral palsy care.

A step forward in Standardizing Patient Reported Outcomes

Hospitals and clinicians in the Cerebral Palsy Research Network will be able to track, learn from, and compare outcomes for their patient populations thanks to our selection of standardized patient outcome measures. The CP Research Network has collaborated with Dr. Unni Narayanan, the subject of our recent CP Stories series, at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada, to standardize a validated set of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) across the network. Working closely with Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus Ohio and Dr. Narayanan’s PRIORITY-BASED SCALES FOR CHILDREN’S OUTCOMES – RESEARCH & EVALUATION (PSCORE) Program, the CP Research Network has released electronic versions of two PROMs to collate patient information across sites in our network.

The Gait Outcomes Assessment List (GOAL) and the Caregiver Priorities and Child Health Index of Life with Disabilities (CPCHILD) will ensure CP families can provide information and communicate their needs to clinicians in patient facing portals like Epic’s MyChart. On a wider scale this submitted data will also help improve treatment more widely in the CP community. Shared decision-making helps balance the input of doctors and experts with the priorities and preferences of patients and their families.

The patient priority framework from PSCORE shows an interrelationship among patient priorities, interventions and outcomes for people living with cerebral palsy.

The patient priority framework from PSCORE shows an interrelationship among patient priorities, interventions and outcomes for living with cerebral palsy.

In addition to these benchmarking capabilities, the PROMs allow patients and patient families to identify important goals, which clinicians can take into account as they make decisions about treatments. And the standardization of PROMs holds the promise to improve medical and surgical outcomes across the network.

Dr. Narayanan has been funded by the Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) to study the impact of these tools in improving shared decision making.

Patient families can use these tools today in MyCP – the CP Research Network’s personalized platform for cerebral palsy resources. The CPCHILD and GOAL Questionnaires are available in the MyCP Community Registry that can be taken annually to track a child’s progress across numerous domains like activities of daily living, mobility or participation. Once a family takes the survey, they can download a PDF of their results which includes their important goals, and bring these results to an appointment with their CP focused physician or therapy team.

The CP Research Network will enhance these tools over time to provide summary reports that will include the scores and list of important goals to better support shared decision making. Parents of children under the age of 18 can sign up for MyCP and take these surveys now.

A banner with MyCP Webinar Series, ‘What is a learning Health Network and why should you care?’ and a photo of Dr. Amy Bailes.

What is a Learning Health Network – and why should you care?

Amy Bailes, PT, PhD

Amy Bailes, PT, PhD

On Monday, June 21, at 8 pm ET, we invite you to tune in for our next MyCP Webinar, to discover why the Cerebral Palsy Research Network is working to become a learning health network and how doing so will enhance our efforts to improve health outcomes.

The webinar will be presented by Amy Bailes PT PhD, leader of the CP Research Network’s quality improvement initiatives. She will outline how learning networks – that often form a registry at their core – can quickly gather and share data that rapidly improve treatment experiences for patients.

During the 40 minute webinar, Dr. Bailes, a physical therapist and researcher at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, will also outline the CP Research Network’s efforts to become a learning health network and how that ties in to clinical initiatives we already have underway.

“Taking the most effective practices from the best CP centers across the nation and spreading those practices in a systematic fashion, will have profound impact on the health of people with CP,” says Dr. Bailes. “This is how we should be caring for all people with CP.”

Learning health networks seek to improve outcomes through a combination of research and quality improvement (QI) initiatives. While some research studies can take years to complete and can require more time to affect a change in practice, QI initiatives can drive systemic change and bring results as early as six months.

“While QI cannot answer fundamental questions about treatment effectiveness or discover new therapeutic interventions, it can be used to dramatically improve health outcomes very rapidly,” says Paul Gross, President and Chief Executive Officer of CP Research Network.

Members of the community, clinicians and researchers interested in learning more about the CP Research Network’s drive to become a learning health network can tune in to the June 21 webinar by registering on the sidebar at the top (or on the MyCP Webinar Registration page).