Cerebral Palsy Research Network Blog

Archive for October 2020 – Page 2

Prevalence of Cerebral Palsy

[This post is part of our Knowledge Translation/Education Tuesday series. Guest author Lily Collison, author of Spastic Diplegia–Bilateral Cerebral Palsy, continues the series. You can ask questions of the author on the MyCP Forum].

The sculpture above “Waiting on shore” is located in our village (Rosses Point) on the Atlantic coast. It reflects the age-old anguish of seafaring people who watched and waited for the safe return of loved ones. It’s a gentle reminder to future generations to remember a proud history of courage and survival, of loss and grief.

In the last two posts, I addressed causes of and risk factors for CP. This week I’ll cover the prevalence of CP. The prevalence of a condition is how many people in a defined population have the condition at a specific point in time. Prevalence rates can vary geographically. A 2013 worldwide review found that the overall prevalence of CP was 2.11 per 1,000 live births*1. A recent (2019) study, however, reported that the birth prevalence** of CP declined across Australian states between 1995 and 20092. The percentage of children with CP whose disability was moderate to severe also decreased. A 2020 report on collaborative research between the European and Australian Surveillance Networks found similar decreasing prevalence of CP in Europe3. This is encouraging.

Some further points to note:

  • CP is the most common cause of physical disability in children4.
  • Males are at higher risk of CP than females. Data from Australia found that 57 percent of those with CP were male, while males represented 51 percent of all births5. This may be because males have certain nerve cell vulnerabilities that may result in CP6. It is noteworthy that there are frequently more male than female participants in CP studies.
  • Relative to its prevalence and its impact on the life span of those with the condition, funding for CP research is very low. The NIH reports research funding by condition. Although the reported prevalence of CP is twice as high as that of Down syndrome (0.2 percent versus 0.1 percent), funding allocated to CP research in 2019 ($28 million) was significantly lower than that of Down syndrome research ($86 million)7. Funding estimates for 2020 and 2021 are $29 and $26 million, respectively, for CP and $113 and $105 million for Down syndrome.
  • An analysis of National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding for CP research from 2001 to 2013 found that only 4 percent went toward studies of CP in adulthood8. Thus research on CP in adulthood receives only a small percentage of an already small budget.

*Births up to 2004.
**This was formerly referred to as “incidence,” but the term “birth prevalence” is now felt to be more accurate2.

1Oskoui M, Coutinho F, Dykeman J, Jetté N, Pringsheim T (2013) An update on the prevalence of cerebral palsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Dev Med Child Neurol 55: 509–519.
2Galea C, Mcintyre S, Smithers-Sheedy H, et al. (2019) Cerebral palsy trends in Australia (1995–2009): a population-based observational study. Dev Med Child Neurol 61: 186–193.
3Sellier E, McIntyre S, Smithers-Sheedy H, Platt MJ, SCPE and ACPR Groups (2020) European and Australian Cerebral Palsy Surveillance Networks Working Together for Collaborative Research. Neuropediatrics 51(2): 105-112.
4Graham HK, Rosenbaum P, Paneth N, et al. (2016) Cerebral palsy. Nat Rev Dis Primers 2: 1–24.
5Australian Cerebral Palsy Register (ACPR) Group (2013) Australian Cerebral Palsy Register Report 2013. [pdf] Available at: .
6Graham HK, Thomason P, Novacheck TF (2014) Cerebral palsy. In: Weinstein SL, Flynn JM, editors, Lovell and Winter’s Pediatric Orthopedics, Level 1 and 2. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, pp 484–554.
7National Institutes of Health (NIH) (2020) Estimates of Funding for Various Research, Condition, and Disease Categories (RCDC). [online] Available at: .
8Wu YW, Mehravari AS, Numis AL, Gross P (2015) Cerebral palsy research funding from the National Institutes of Health, 2001 to 2013. Dev Med Child Neurol 57: 936–941.

CPRN Investigator Funded for Feasibility Study

Ed Hurvitz, MD, Chair of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan
Ed Hurvitz, MD, Chair of Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation, University of Michigan

Edward A. Hurvitz MD of Michigan Medicine, University of Michigan and Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) Executive Committee, was awarded the Foundation for Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation Gabriella Molnar grant for a project entitled “Feasibility of Adding Grip Strength Measures to Body Composition Assessments in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy.”  The aim of the project is to test the feasibility of adding measures such as waist-hip circumference, skinfold measures, and grip strength to a regular clinic appointment for individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) from age 8 through adulthood, and then potentially as data points in the CPRN CP Registry.  The Michigan Adults with Pediatric Onset Disabilities research group has published extensively on chronic disease risk in adults with CP.  Body composition and grip strength are well documented indicators for risk of morbidity and mortality in typical developing populations, and obesity has been associated with risk of multi-morbidity in adults with CP, including young adults between ages 18-40.  The study will also include a history of chronic disease with an exploratory aim to correlate body composition and hand grip findings to history. 

CPRN congratulates Dr. Hurvitz and his colleagues for their success in funding this research which was originally approved as a concept for CPRN in April 2019. This study addresses top priorities from Research CP, including the study of the effects of aging with cerebral palsy as well as laying the groundwork to do studies of exercise strategies to promote better health outcomes.  Co-investigators on the study include Drs. Mark Peterson, Dan Whitney, Heidi Haapala, Mary Schmidt, Angeline Bowman and Jessica Pruente. The funding amount is $10,000 dollars, to be used for measurement equipment and research assistance.  The start date is December 1, and the study is planned for 18 months.

World CP Day — Make Your Mark

The Cerebral Palsy Research Network (CPRN) is proud to participate in this year’s World CP Day.  We at CPRN, with our partner CP NOW, are enabling members of the cerebral palsy (CP) community to “Make Your Mark” through participation in CP research.  A little less than a year ago we launched MyCP.org and invited the extended CP community to make a difference by contributing to research – setting research direction, contributing your experience and interacting with clinician researchers committed to improving outcomes for people with CP.  MyCP is now over 1,000 people strong providing news, discussions and opportunities to participate in research from your phone or computer.  This past March we launched the MyCP webinar series so members of the community could learn about CPRN research initiatives directly from CPRN researchers.  Our research reaches from diagnosis into retirement so our community of people with CP, parents, advocates, clinicians and researchers are working to improve quality of life throughout the lifespan.  Join MyCP and tell us how you have made your mark!